inexorability


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Synonyms for inexorability

Synonyms for inexorability

mercilessness characterized by an unwillingness to relent or let up

References in periodicals archive ?
301) As such, they are defined vis-a-vis their parents; in this regard, the scope of parental authority is grounded in, and justified by, the inexorability of the parent-child bond.
Do we continue with pounding inexorability, or relax in the balm of the slow movement before the torment resumes?
One minute he was disputing fourth, the next he took off and was running down the Irish trailblazer with a breathtaking inexorability.
The flawless beauty of Novack's coverage of dynamited mountains, slurry pools and rapidly churned-out coal underscores the inexorability of the practice and the devastation in its wake.
Futhermore, White aptly argues: 'A complete pattern of mythological correspondences covering the whole of a novel is bound to generate a far greater mood of inexorability.
The unity among Indians and the inexorability of death are presented from the beginning.
Leonard returns home only to learn of this disaster and comes to recognize the inexorability of time over affection.
A culturally centripetal Caribbean philosophy of history would separate itself from Hegelian dialectics with its teleological inexorability and would uphold instead Brathwaite's concept of "tidalectics," a far more humane notion.
The rupture that has occurred, even discounting the exacerbating effect of a personality clash between Smith and Perot, was foreordained with Sophoclean inexorability in the terms of the "E' stock.
The tragic sense of inexorability and loss is, well, lost.
Has any place-kicker exuded such an aura of inexorability before?
She brings an appealingly modern poetic sensibility to "Oedipus," as well, teasing out contemporary-feeling questions of free will and intoxicating self-knowledge without losing the play's shamanistic insistence on fate's inexorability.
In Bellamy's production, the slaves act as a dithyrambic chorus, underscoring the inexorability of the impending tragedy with spiritual-inflected song.
Framing these pieces were two masterpieces from World War II, Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem somehow appropriately muffled in delivery, needing more weighty inexorability in the Lacrymosa and less unaccountable tonebending from wind solos in the Dies Irae, and Stravinsky's Symphony in Three Movements punchily rhythmic, but missing a touch of neo-classical lightness for contrast.
However, since the bulk of the metaphor's rhetorical power lies in the unstoppable physical power of the referent and the tsunami-as-culture's inexorability, it would likely work just fine in most everyday usages.