indigo plant


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Synonyms for indigo plant

deciduous subshrub of southeastern Asia having pinnate leaves and clusters of red or purple flowers

References in periodicals archive ?
We have put up our Liquid Indigo plant to support and strengthen the Denim industry of Pakistan to help make it more environmentally and economically sustainable.
In addition to the educational sessions, the Dscoop visitors were also led on a variety of Indigo plant tours at Kiryat Gat, where they had the opportunity to walk the press manufacturing plant floor, as well as the Electrolnk mixing and testing facility and the Electrolnk manufacturing plant.
In her artist statement, she states that, "Wars were fought and fortunes made by those who controlled the seeds of the indigo plant. Today patenting and genetic modification of seeds for money and power threaten ecological sustainability." Ecological campaigner and seed activist Dr Vandana Shiva discusses the current patenting of seeds by large corporations as a new form of colonisation.
Anil, the English term for blue dye derived from the indigo plant, traces to the word hill, meaning 'dark blue' in Hindi, Marathi, and other Sanskritic languages.
It usually was colored with indigo plant dye, which made the jean cloth a dark blue color, which is still favored today.
"And an indigo plant that's young versus old will have a totally different shade," he added.
Woad (Isatis tinctoria) provided Europe's ancient and medieval indigo dye but, like Japan's indigo plant (Polygonum tinctorium), it was traditionally processed and used as a leaf compost unsuited to intercontinental trade.
"In anticipation of greater demand for DyStar Indigo(r) Vat 40% Solution and an increased market share, the DyStar Group is planning to expand capacity at its Nanjing Indigo plant in China," said Harry Dobrowolski, CEO of the DyStar Group.
The natives' love for brilliant colors saw the widespread use of natural plant dyes such as blue dye from indigo plants; white dye from rice water; red from tree bark; yellow dye from ginger root; and black hues from burying fibers in mud.