indelicate

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Related to indelicacies: blundering
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  • adj

Synonyms for indelicate

Synonyms for indelicate

Synonyms for indelicate

in violation of good taste even verging on the indecent

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lacking propriety and good taste in manners and conduct

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verging on the indecent

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References in periodicals archive ?
The application of such praise to The Castle in the Forest would be a delicate matter, but then Mailer, for all the indelicacies that he refuses to avert our eyes from, is in certain respects a delicate writer.
No such indelicacies at Symphony Hall, thank goodness, but the strange sight of grown men wearing tiered plant pots on their heads.
We were disgusted in twenty pages, as, independent of a bad translation, it has indelicacies which disgrace a pen hitherto so pure; and we changed it for the "Female Quixotte," [Charlotte Lennox's 1752 novel, The Female Quixote] which now makes our evening amusement; to me a very high one, as I find the work quite equal to what I remembered it.
12) The reviewer of the Gentleman's Magazine also thought very highly of the quality of Froude's translation and was in no way disquieted by the possibility that British readers might be seduced 'from the plain paths of duty and of ordinary good-sense', for according to him German novelists did not do harm in England, while French writers such as Eugene Sue and George Sand could justifiably be accused of breathing 'a poisoned breath' over the 'moral atmosphere, and that not because of their indelicacies, but because of their deliberate and powerful attacks upon all social institutions; because they heartlessly knock aside the crutch upon which the cripple leans, without doing any thing which can enable him to go without it'.
Fund, who fumed famously at Bill Clinton's indelicacies, was arrested in New York Feb.
We see how far Valincour is from the lax bantering of Sorel: transgressions against vraisemblance (the imprudences of a woman considered wise, the indelicacies of a gentleman, etc.