immanent

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Synonyms for immanent

of a mental act performed entirely within the mind

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of qualities that are spread throughout something

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References in periodicals archive ?
In consequence, it is possible to suggest that the immanentism that Bakunin imbibed from The Way to a Blessed Life shaped his concept of the meaning and substance of 'democracy' and that the progressive social praxis taught in Lectures on the Vocation of the Scholar rough-hewed his ideas about the tasks to be accomplished within the 'secret society' even before 'democracy' was instantiated in society-at-large.
(34) In the same way as Aquinas opposes (in the rejection of the position of Avicenna as the main representative of externalism) the Augustinian claim that man leams only by the influence of the first cause, he challenges (in line with his defense of the Aristotelian position) the Platonic doctrine that all learning is recollection, as a representative of immanentism.
In the first half of the twentieth century, the hegemony of scholastic philosophy in seminary education, and more widely in Catholic higher education, was secured with the promulgation of Pope Pius X's (1907) encyclical Pascendi Dominici Gregis, which condemned modernism, a compilation of heresies that embraced such varied errors as agnosticism, immanentism, and evolutionism.
Communists gladly subscribed to this opinion so that, when the souls of men have been deprived of every idea of a personal God, they may the more efficaciously defend and propagate their dialectical materialism." (122) The Pope further said that "such fictitious tenets of evolution which repudiate all that is absolute, firm and immutable, have paved the way for the new erroneous philosophy which, rivaling idealism, immanentism and pragmatism, has assumed the name of existentialism, since it concerns itself only with existence of individual things and neglects all consideration of their immutable essences."
* Ascribing divinity to nature, meaning pantheism or one of its variants--"panentheism," "immanentism" and so on.
Yet although the shift to immanentism was certainly crucial, the reconceptualization of transcendence as sublimity was of equal importance....
Despite their greatly differing theological commitments, then, de Vries insists that we can read Adorno's "anti" and Levinas's "hyper" as working together to overcome both naturalism and immanentism. Each tries to work toward a fundamentally paradoxical formulation of transcendence as undecidable and aporetic.
Agnostism and immanentism represent the negative and positive sides of Modernist thought, the former arguing human reason can only consider scientific phenomenon, the latter arguing that religion comes entirely from within the human psyche (Jodock 4).
The enemies of Krausism in Spain had focused on its apparent immanentism; however, Krause had rejected Schelling because of the pantheism professed in his works (de Jongh-Rossel, pp.
The second influence, which might be described as an immanentism, is a descendant of Neoplatonic philosophy, recast in the context of Arabo-Muslim philosophy and Sufism.
The liberal discourse emphasizes how God acts in and through nature (immanentism).
The poetic voice explains in "Immanence" that the "deity" invoked through this reappropriated, redefined, and lesbianized "transubstantiation" is not Christ but rather "my Julia." The very title of the poem, "Immanence," suggests a connection between "Julia's" invocation and "idolatry," since "immanentism" may refer to the belief that some god or spirit (here, "Julia") pervades everything in the universe, (8) and the worship of such an "idol" is a defiance against sacred images and figures.
In concluding, McGlothlin took a shot at the liberal tradition by cautioning against immanentism that he thought to be exemplary of Greek thought.