idyll

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  • noun

Synonyms for idyll

heaven

Synonyms for idyll

an episode of such pastoral or romantic charm as to qualify as the subject of a poetic idyll

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a musical composition that evokes rural life

a short poem descriptive of rural or pastoral life

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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Arthur and many other characters in the Idylls, the ill-fated knight is fully aware of his tragic situation.
His 1906 Three Idylls had many different textures and tone colours, all in dark mood with a curious impression of American music, the third Idyll pre-echoing some Gershwin idioms.
WE have recently moved to North Tyneside after looking for properties in city centres in the area, suburbs and the rural idylls in Durham and Northumberland.
The landscape of Wales is about to change dramatically, with mostly rural idylls transformed into towns of sulphur, smoke and fire, Huw Edwards, above, finds in the fourth episode of The Story of Wales.
There were dozens of other pastorals and idylls popular at this time, as well, and no doubt Miller was quite familiar with the form.
Alfred Tennyson's prefatory manuscript note to "The Coming of Arthur," the first of his Idylls of the King, (1) remarks that its "form"--the next sentence implicitly indicates verse form--is "purposely more archaic than that of the other Idylls" (2) An earlier note to the same Idyll quotes eighteen lines on Arthur's nativity and infancy from Layamon's Brut, a vast thirteenth-century Middle English verse chronicle recounting the history of Britain from its founding by the mythical Brutus of Troy to its final conquest by the English.
Yet something happened between the years of Coleridge's assessment and Gladstone's pronouncement that transformed culturally problematic Welsh legends into icons for Anglican nationalism, and that something was Alfred Lord Tennyson's Idylls of the King.
This new edition of "The Cardinal's Snuff-Box" from Idylls Press is a true 'time lost' literary treasure that is once again made available to a whole new generation of readers and will serve to re-introduce Henry Harland as a gifted novelist deserving rescue from obscurity.
Of course, News From Nowhere is not the only place Tolkien could have found an idealized English rural landscape: many authors of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries described rural idylls. George Eliot is only one example of someone who wrote about the largely pre-industrial Midland landscape (a similar area to that in which the young Tolkien spent his two brief "rural idylls") of the 1820s and 1830s.
This gem of a disc brings a masterpiece of the English string quartet repertoire (the Elgar), one which deserves to be much better known (the Walton, an early, well-wrought and passionate piece which brought the composer unprecedented success in the first International Society for Contemporary Music Festival in Salzburg in 1923), and a truly enchanting offering from the fascinating Frank Bridge, his Three Idylls of 1906.
The tale, which originated in Celtic myth and was revisited by everyone from Sir Thomas Malory ("Morte D'Arthur") to Lord Alfred Tennyson ("Idylls of the King") to Richard Wagher (the opera "Tristan and Isolde"), involves the betrayal of a king (Rufus Sewell), whose bride-to-befalls in love with his nephew.
But, thankfully, Rem has resisted the temptation to go for Grayson Perry-esque tableaux of sex and violence and stuck with rural idylls and gentlemen being courtly in frock coats.
Tennyson's Idylls of the king is probably an attempt on the largest scale to retell the story of King Arthur and his knights.
Idylls II, 2003, also combines in a video drawing the most fundamental of artistic tools with a high-tech medium.