i.e.


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Synonyms for i.e.

that is

Synonyms

Synonyms for i.e.

that is to say

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
In all fairness, what needs to be done is for City agencies to use either a larger bag (i.e., greater than a 10% overhead allowance) or to shove fewer cost items into that same 10% overhead allowance.
With the clustered Exchange servers, when the primary Exchange server fails, the backup Exchange server connects to the volume set (i.e., the check-point file, the log files and the database) in the IP SAN and continues the service to the clients.
Some students said that they preferred fun and interactive activities such as group discussion and presentation by famous people (i.e., celebrities).
Since efforts during the return season are focused elsewhere (due to this data being for informational reporting purposes only), the integrity of this schedule for any taxpayer should be questioned, i.e., taxpayers have solid, common worldwide reporting systems and comply with the requirements of Schedule M to the best of their ability.
A chronic perforation can exist in a case of acute otorrhea (i.e., from acute otitis media or from acute contamination) and not be consistent with CSOM unless the chronicity of the infection has been established.
* Prime contractor and government buyers agree that buying selected spares (i.e. high cost/long-lead) concurrent with "production installs" (e.g.
* Health Care (i.e., Head Start, Nursing Student Loans)
From the street, it appears somewhat impenetrable, even bunkerlike; once you are on the inside, all is transparent: the house takes the form of a meandering semicircle of glass neatly curving around a central courtyard, with the bedroom, two bathrooms, study, and living room arranged like links on a chain, in the manner of Judd's "one thing after another." The debt to classic California postwar architecture is, of course, evident, but mercifully muted - i.e., there are few blatant Julius Shulman-esque photo-ops.
The first half of the book roughly follows the narrative track laid out by MacHaffie, although Lindley begins abruptly with a chapter on Anne Hutchinson, followed by chapters on "Quakers" and "Puritanism." Rather than surveying the diversity present in the British colonies at the outset, as MacHaffie does, Lindley waits to acknowledge it until chapter 4, a chapter devoted to those who are not Euro-American Puritans (i.e., Anglicans, Catholics, Native Americans, and African Americans).
It is necessity, its end is acquisition, it must be impressive (show and be recognized), and it is politicized, i.e., understood by its political effects.
We have been particularly successful with a plan called "descending pyramids." The pyramid involves three sets of an exercise for a particular body area, with each set being properly performed in an all-out manner (i.e., to momentary muscular fatigue).
Secondary prevention is the effort aimed at reducing or halting the progression of the disabling condition after the initial injury has occurred (i.e., specialized emergency medical services for those who sustain an SCI).
and i.e. The first stands for exempli gratia, meaning for example; the second represents id est, meaning that is.
Competitive advantage will increasingly become available to those health care organizations that can demonstrate mastery of the cost-quality relationship and deliver true value to their stakeholders (i.e., value = (quality/cost) x volume[1]).
A basic requirement for the maintenance of expertise, and of a reputation for expertise, is that of staying current - i.e., keeping up with what other research workers are doing that is relevant to one's own work (Wilson, 1993).