horse

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Synonyms for horse

horse around or about

Synonyms

Synonyms for horse

References in classic literature ?
The cardoon is as high as a horse's back, but the Pampas thistle is often higher than the crown of the rider's head.
Nearly the whole country was covered with good though coarse grass, which was as high as a horse's belly; yet there were square leagues without a single head of cattle.
Rostov without hearing Boris to the end spurred his horse.
"There he is!" said Boris, thinking Rostov had said "His Highness," and pointing to the Grand Duke who with his high shoulders and frowning brows stood a hundred paces away from them in his helmet and Horse Guards' jacket, shouting something to a pale, white uniformed Austrian officer.
"Well, my Highness would like some oats," declared the horse.
Then the servants heaped a lot of rugs upon the floor and the old horse slept on the softest bed he had ever known in his life.
The rest of the powder seemed to have vanished into the body of the horse.
In an encampment, however, of such fancied security as that in which Captain Bonneville found his Indian friends, much of these precautions with respect to their horses are omitted.
One object of Captain Bonneville in wintering among these Indians was to procure a supply of horses against the spring.
Ginger and I were not of the regular tall carriage horse breed, we had more of the racing blood in us.
"For fashion!" said the old horse with a stamp of his foot; "for fashion!
They glided from tree to tree till they arrived at twenty steps from the house unperceived and saw by means of a lantern suspended under a hut, four fine horses. A groom was rubbing them down; near them were saddles and bridles.
the white horse will perhaps grow weaker, and if the horse does not fall, the master must pull up at last." But horse and rider remained upright together, gaining ground by difficult degrees.
Their shaggy, big-bellied horse, all covered with snow, breathed heavily under the low shaft-bow and, evidently using the last of its strength, vainly endeavoured to escape from the switch, hobbling with its short legs through the deep snow which it threw up under itself.
Snodgrass, when the horse had executed this manoeuvre for the twentieth time.