harm

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Synonyms for harm

Synonyms for harm

the action or result of inflicting loss or pain

Synonyms for harm

References in classic literature ?
You need not come to us for another mantle, when the rain has spoilt your fine one; and do not stay here, or we will do you harm."
When the flowers told their sorrow to kind-hearted Lily-Be]l, she wept bitterly at the pain her friend had given, and with loving words strove to comfort those whom he had grieved; with gentle care she healed the wounded birds, and watched above the flowers he had harmed, bringing each day dew and sunlight to refresh and strengthen, till all were well again; and though sorrowing for their dead friends, still they forgave Thistle for the sake of her who had done so much for them.
You must harm no flower in doing your work, nor take more than your just share of honey; for they so kindly give us food, it were most cruel to treat them with aught save gentleness and gratitude.
So while the industrious bees were out among the flowers, he led the drones to the hive, and took possession of the honey, destroying and laying waste the home of the kind bees; then, fearing that in their grief and anger they might harm him, Thistle flew away to seek new friends.
On he went, thinking of Lily-Bell, and for her sake bearing all; for in his quiet prison many gentle feelings and kindly thoughts had sprung up in his heart, and he now strove to be friends with all, and win for himself the love and confidence of those whom once he sought to harm and cruelly destroy.
So he tried to show, by quiet deeds of kindness, that he meant no harm to them; and soon the kind-hearted birds pitied the lonely Fairy, and when he came near sang cheering songs, and dropped ripe berries in his path, for he no longer broke their eggs, or hurt their little ones.
He came one day, while wandering through the garden, to the little rose he had once harmed so sadly.
Her gentleness has changed my cruelty to kindness, and I would gladly repay all for the harm I have done; but none will love and trust me now."
"I will seek to win their pardon, and show them that I am no longer the cruel Fairy who so harmed them," thought Thistle, "and when they become again my friends, I will ask their help to find the Air Spirits; and if I deserve it, they will gladly aid me on my way."
See how bitterly he weeps; be kind to him, he will not harm us more.
While the old commitment standard was frequently interpreted, correctly or incorrectly, as requiring that the harm be imminent, harms that are reasonably expected to occur months or even years from now could be the basis for commitment under the new law.
Decisions must take account of scientific knowledge of medical harms, and social and economic evidence, as well as the insight provided by public consultation, and the knowledge and understanding provided by public bodies and Government departments.
Henrikson, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the benefits and harms of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to inform the USPSTF.
In other words, one in every five adult in the U.S has experienced harm due to a relative, a friend or even a stranger's drinking habit.
Those harms include threats or harassment, damaged property, vandalism, physical aggression, financial problems, relationship issues and issues related to driving.