hagiographer


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Synonyms for hagiographer

the author of a worshipful or idealizing biography

References in periodicals archive ?
She argues that because both saints' deaths were political rather than spiritual, liegois hagiographers had to recast them as holy martyrs, not worldly victims of political entanglements.
Cunningham feels that this change occurred back in Louvain rather than in Ireland and that the hagiographer John Colgan was the person behind the decision to amend the text.
Nuada's hand was, after all, made by the god of healing himself, and Melor was a saint, so obviously the hagiographer had to fit some miracles into the boy's tragically short life.
It amply illustrates Bede's many-sided career as "a textual critic and linguist, a preacher and liturgist, a geographer and computist, an educator, a poet and a hagiographer in addition to being an exegete and a historian" (127).
37) Staying truthful to the past, however, Peter's hagiographer did not omit it.
Timothy Neat, who was a close associate of Henderson's over many years, is no hagiographer, though at times he makes exaggerated claims.
The foreign academics were chosen by the Republic's constitutional advisor for 30 years, Clare Palley, who also had a stint as the Ethnarch's official hagiographer.
For the words of Stone's hagiographer Myra MacPherson dismissing Stone's actions with the phrase "being misled and naive does not make one a spy" to be offered as countervailing evidence is an example of what it means to get the story wrong.
Our role should be that of critical friend, not managerial apologist or hagiographer.
He minds the many pitfalls of his art, Wary of biographers who err In idolizing, tearing men apart, Iconoclast or hagiographer.
One wonders if the inclusion of the Castro hagiographer Saul Landau, who signed one recent article with the exclamation "Viva Fidel
This book presents proceedings of the 2004 colloquium in Jersey on the twelfth-century vernacular hagiographer and historical writer Wace.
Art, for Louis-Combet, bears the only hope of filling the void: the narrators of this author's mythobiographies often occupy the role of the latter-day hagiographer while documenting their own loss of faith.
Aware of Wolfe's faults as man and writer, Mauldin is not a hagiographer.