gyve

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Synonyms for gyve

something that physically confines the legs or arms

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the literature, BA is the most commonly used cytokinin in micropropagation of teak, alone or combined with kinetin or auxin (Monteuuis et al., 1998; Gangopadhyay et al., 2002; Tiwari et al., 2002; Yasodha et al., 2005; Gyves et al., 2007; Akram and Aftab 2009).
Alejandro de Gyves is the ActionCOACH Master Licensee in a number of countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Chile, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Portugal.
For example, gyves denotes 'in both Cymbeline and Complaint imprisoning devices desired by the prisoner': Posthumus speaks of gyves | Desired more than constrained' (v.
Gyves, In Re Caremark: Good Intentions, Unintended Consequences, 39 WAKE FOREST L.
The Jailer's Daughter continues this image in her soliloquies, after she lets Palamon escape from prison, remembering his "iron bracelets" and worrying lest "the jingling of his gyves / Might call fell things to listen" (3.3.14-15).
Not even with the gory gyves, Now eager for our worthless lives-- Nor for the bondman's sorrowing tears, Make an ignoble truce.
Furthermore, of the same metals they make great chains, fetters, and gyves wherein they tie their bondmen.
Gyves's "Getting inside the Enemy's Head: The Case for Counter-analysis in Iraqi Counterinsurgency Operations" (http://www.airpower.maxwell.
We jumped to the conclusion that he had heard of this cockfighting business, and we expected (and hoped) to see the schoolmaster led away like Eugene Aram with gyves upon his wrist.
After the Greek general is killed, the chorus concludes the play with a description of his life as a lesson on fortune: "Lo here how ficle fortune gyves but brytle fading joy." (82) Even in his other translations of Seneca, which are far less free than Troas and Oedipus or even Agamemnon, Studley tellingly keeps passages on the fortunes of kings; Nuce does the same in Octavia.
See Elson & Gyves, supra note 7, at 872-73 (recognizing several large charitable donations from Enron Corp.