gut


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb
  • adj

Synonyms for gut

Synonyms for gut

Synonyms for gut

the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus

a narrow channel or strait

Related Words

a strong cord made from the intestines of sheep and used in surgery

Synonyms

Related Words

empty completely

Related Words

remove the guts of

References in periodicals archive ?
When the children reached 15-17 years, the composition and diversity of their gut microbiota were measured from stool samples.
These bacteria can be found in the mouth, skin, and nose, but most are found in the gut. The gut is a long passageway that ingests food, absorbs its nutrients, and eliminates its waste.
Women with PCOS were found to have lower alpha diversity in their gut microbiome, as evidenced by abundance (P = .04) and Faith's phylogenetic diveristy (P = .02).
As part of the series, the center will offer different styles of gut from different regions that are designated national intangible cultural assets.
A large body of evidence suggests that gut microbiota and SCFAs exhibit positive effects on glucose-lowering agents in T2DM.
Cammarota, "Gut microbiota as a driver of inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease," Mediators of Inflammation, vol.
CANCER patients respond best to treatment when they have the right bacteria in their guts, research indicates.
Gut problems affect people in all areas of their life with one in five (19%) having to take a day off work due to their symptoms and over a quarter (28%) avoiding going out.
In addition to the serotonin produced by the EC, some species of gut microorganisms also produce serotonin directly, along with other neurotransmitter molecules.
Some people are just unlucky enough to have a predisposition to a leaky gut - regardless of age or gender - but lifestyle factors could also be to blame.
An observational study, whose first author is Caroline Le Roy from King's College London in the United Kingdom, examined the gut health of red wine drinkers and compared it with that of people who drank other types of alcohol.
Researchers have found evidence that links gut health to autoimmune diseases.