grandiloquence


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  • noun

Synonyms for grandiloquence

pretentious, pompous speech or writing

Synonyms for grandiloquence

References in periodicals archive ?
Again, Steiner's (1994) grandiloquence is perhaps not unwarranted: "The community must be persuaded of the fallibility of its own judgment, of the responsibility of its educators to broker the difference between its self-understanding and the silences, the blindness, which that self-understanding has induced" (p.
The footage makes it clear that "Lucy" is vintage Besson, with Johansson's naive party girl gradually evolving into a latter-day version of the sleek assassin played by Anne Parillaud in "La Femme Nikita" (1990), while the trippy, candy-colored visuals hark back to the outre grandiloquence of 1997's "The Fifth Element." Drawing an explicit link between Johansson's eponymous heroine and the similarly named bipedal skeleton discovered by French geologist Maurice Taieb in Ethiopia in 1974, Besson even inserts a computer-animated version of the prehistoric Lucy into a prologue modeled on the dawn of Man sequence from "2001: A Space Odyssey"--one of several such homages that are sure to inspire his detractors to draw their knives.
Harris's style is an odd mix of dry proceduralism and poetic grandiloquence inflected with Romantic visions (William Blake features prominently in the plot of Red Dragon).
The most Broadway-like singing was done by soprano Alicia Gianni in Petra the maid's alternately randy and wistful song, but mellow-voiced Canadian mezzo Carolyn Sproule affectingly avoided operatic grandiloquence as the long-suffering, tart-tongued wife of the bombastic Count Carl-Magnus Malcolm, potently sung by baritone Mark Diamond.
Joseph of Tufts University in his hagiographic Stokely: A Life, Carmichael told his followers: "To ask Negroes to get in the Democratic party is like asking Jews to join the Nazi party." Enraptured by his own bombast, Carmichael added, "When you talk of 'black power,' you talk of building a movement that will smash everything Western civilization has created." With grandiloquence matching that of his subject Joseph implausibly argues that Carmichael--"America's leading critic of the Vietnam war" and "the world's foremost black revolutionary"--belongs in the "pantheon" of black leaders alongside Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King.
It was a 10-minute pep talk that offered oratorical flourishes but limited substance, the kind of grandiloquence that she generally shuns back in Houston.
While there was typical grandiloquence in these remarks, Rai had a defensible point: The Catholic Church has long contested Israeli sovereignty over Jerusalem, which is a city for all its communities.
Dans quelques pieces, des personnages s'obligeaient presque a y recourir quand leur rang ou leur statut de feodal ou de parvenu conduisaient a des declamations faites de grandiloquence et de solennite.
To modern aesthetic-liturgical proclivities, Barber's piece may seem maudlin in a sacred setting, with the grandiloquence of its final measures (fig.
Joaquin Phoenix's self-flagellating performance (reprising some of his moves from The Master) and the movie's own self-conscious grandiloquence continually reminded me of a much better actor, Daniel Day-Lewis, in the second half of a similarly misguided American epic, There Will Be Blood (2007).
The question is, does the great orator, the master of grandiloquence believe in his own words?
Point de grandiloquence, nulle place a la pedanterie et a l emphase dans l'ecriture de ce recit qui se fait fluide et simple, se lisant d'un seul trait.
The hundreds of pages of briefs and transcripts from the court proceedings contain the law's usual mix of minutiae and grandiloquence. There is the question of whether Dan was standing on the sidewalk or on the base of the White House fence.
Formal and courtly, unless in the midst of a fit of high-handedness or artistic grandiloquence, Mamoulian moves through the world at a remove.
In an exasperated yet prescient early review of Tough Guys, Denis Donoghue explains why he remains patient with Mailer's exhibitions of exorbitant grandiloquence: