gay


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • adj
  • noun

Synonyms for gay

Synonyms for gay

full of color

of, relating to, or having a sexual orientation to members of one's own sex

Synonyms for gay

bright and pleasant

Synonyms

Related Words

full of or showing high-spirited merriment

given to social pleasures often including dissipation

Related Words

brightly colored and showy

Synonyms

Related Words

offering fun and gaiety

Related Words

homosexual or arousing homosexual desires

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Way out west, even the red states are betting heavily on gay visitors.
The airline has offered health benefits to domestic partners since 1999, and after scoring a lower-than-expected rating on the Human Rights Campaign's annual Corporate Equality Index in 2004, the company formed a team of 20 gay and lesbian employees to address the inadequacy.
Drugs, steroids, gay male body image and crystal methamphetamines are all explored in Signorile's work.
Rotello's central theme, as explained by Robinson is that the AIDS pandemic was caused by what he calls "anal multipartnerism"--suggesting that the pandemic was the "predictable result of changes in the sexual behavior of gay men.
"Maybe more states will now pass legislation protecting kids from gay adoption." Mathew D.
Some lawmakers and judges in other states do indeed share a horror of gay parenthood.
In addition to its gay and lesbian film library, Here!
The purpose of this article is to detail the current knowledge regarding the provision of culturally appropriate career services to gay and lesbian clients.
But this formula of "gay = black" has upset some LGBT of color.
She couldn't even say the words "gay" or "homosexual" when she finally got up the courage to call a local Catholic priest in whom Jim already had confided.
Many important figures associated with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s were gay, lesbian or bisexual, but most writers from this time did not write about gay themes publicly.
Given all the national rhetoric about the sanctity of marriage and the importance of raising children within a legally recognized relationship, one would assume that legislators would take note of the growing numbers of young children being raised by gay parents and get to work passing legislation legitimizing their parents' relationship.
If someone had uttered a warning cry in the 1970s when homosexuals were flooding into the seminaries, that substantial numbers of gay priests would deliberately flout the rule of celibacy, that they would gain control of many seminaries, would openly "date," and would promote a homosexual culture which would drive heterosexuals away from the seminaries--such a person would have been ostracized as a hysterical gay-hater.
Yet one's personal life often spills over into their professional life and while heterosexual employees enjoy the privilege of sharing personal events in their lives via conversations, parties or photographs, gay and lesbian individuals are often not afforded that same privilege.
Stein also tries to move gay and lesbian history forward in another important way.