gas-cooled reactor


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Words related to gas-cooled reactor

a nuclear reactor using gas as a coolant

References in periodicals archive ?
temperature, gas-cooled reactors that would use fuel whose melting point
Liu, "Nuclear graphite for high temperature gas-cooled reactors," New Carbon Materials, vol.
HTR-10 (10 MW High-Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor) is the first experimental high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in China, which is designed and constructed in the 1990s, brought to criticality in 2000, and reached full power operation in 2003 [11] and commercial 600MW High-Temperature Reactor-Pebble-bed Modules (HTR-PM600, Figure 2) will be the next HTR in China (Figure 1).
But in a report to shareholders in the company prospectus, British Energy bosses warned the problem could potentially lead to "early closures at certain of our AGR (advanced gas-cooled reactor) stations".
Since Lohnert and Reutler proposed the concept of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the end of the 1970s, various countries have put a lot of attention on development of modular HTGR for its high degree of passive safety and the potential to provide high-temperature fluid for process heat applications [1, 2].
The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHR) can survive a complete loss-of-coolant accident without reliance on any emergency systems.
The fuel elements of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTR) are spherical and have an overall diameter of 60 mm.
The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has some remarkable advantages, such as inherent safety, higher power efficiency, and wide diversity of heat utilization [1].
As Professor Ian Fells once explained, the nominal output of an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) was 1,200MW.
The first Chinese HTGR called HTR-10, a 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor, was designed and built by INET.
One of the designs being considered for the so-called Generation IV nuclear power program is the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The reactor would operate at such high temperatures that it could do more than just generate electricity.