gardener


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Synonyms for gardener

someone who takes care of a garden

someone employed to work in a garden

References in classic literature ?
He began gathering the grape-leaves which screened the sun from the grapes, and won the heart of the gardener. "Did you come here, sir, to see the telegraph?" he said.
"Oh, no," said the gardener; "not in the least, since there is no danger that anyone can possibly understand what we are saying."
"Sir," said the gardener, glancing at the sun-dial, "the ten minutes are almost up; I must return to my post.
When I go, none of the gardeners are to be anywhere near the Long Walk by the garden walls.
"In the winter-nights--" the Gardener was beginning.
"It's as much as my place is worth!', the Gardener muttered, taking a key from his pocket, and beginning to unlock a door in the garden-wall.
Having delivered his message the gardener was about to withdraw, but I stopped him to request that he would come back before dark, and sit up that night, in one of the empty bedrooms, so as to be within call in case I wanted him.
Before midnight Sir Percival's strange temper broke out in the most violent and most alarming manner, and if the gardener had not been on the spot to pacify him on the instant, I am afraid to think what might have happened.
The gardener immediately ran down to him, and I closed the door of communication, to keep the alarm, if possible, from reaching Miss Halcombe's ears.
On the first occasion she told me the poison was wanted by the gardener for use in the conservatories.
My wife was the person who gave orders to the gardener and cook--not I.
He had seen her before either I or the gardener had seen her, though we knew which way to look, and he didn't.
Before he followed her, the Sergeant relieved his mind on the subject of the gravel walks by a parting word to the gardener. "Get her ladyship to try grass," he said, with a sour look at the paths.
First came ten soldiers carrying clubs; these were all shaped like the three gardeners, oblong and flat, with their hands and feet at the corners: next the ten courtiers; these were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two and two, as the soldiers did.
Alice was rather doubtful whether she ought not to lie down on her face like the three gardeners, but she could not remember ever having heard of such a rule at processions; `and besides, what would be the use of a procession,' thought she, `if people had all to lie down upon their faces, so that they couldn't see it?' So she stood still where she was, and waited.