transfer

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Synonyms for transfer

Synonyms for transfer

to go or cause to go from one place to another

to change one's residence or place of business, for example

to relinquish to the possession or control of another

to direct (a person) elsewhere for help or information

to change the ownership of (property) by means of a legal document

the act of delivering or the condition of being delivered

a making over of legal ownership or title

Synonyms for transfer

someone who transfers or is transferred from one position to another

the act of transfering something from one form to another

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a ticket that allows a passenger to change conveyances

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application of a skill learned in one situation to a different but similar situation

transfer somebody to a different position or location of work

lift and reset in another soil or situation

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change from one vehicle or transportation line to another

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shift the position or location of, as for business, legal, educational, or military purposes

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transfer from one place or period to another

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References in periodicals archive ?
The application of microvascular free-tissue transfer has revolutionized the postablative and post-traumatic reconstruction of the head and neck region.
The other patient, a 62-year-old man, underwent reconstruction of a similar defect via radial forearm free-tissue transfer. The flap was evaluated 4 days postoperatively by TNE because of excessive edema noted in the cervical skin flaps.
The radial forearm fasciocutaneous free-tissue transfer was popularized by Soutar et al in 1983 for oral cavity reconstruction.
Experience with 80 rectus abdominis free-tissue transfers. Plast Reconstr Surg 1989;83(3):481-7.
Therefore, medicinal leeches are used to salvage compromised microvascular free-tissue transfers, replanted digits, ears, lips, and nasal tips until angiogenesis gradually improves the physiological venous drainage [4].