fly agaric


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Synonyms for fly agaric

poisonous (but rarely fatal) woodland fungus having a scarlet cap with white warts and white gills

References in periodicals archive ?
What to see during autumn and winter: Keep an eye open for a wide range of interesting fungi including scarlet elfcup, fly agaric (right), red-cracking bolete and shaggy scalycap that thrive in this diverse woodland.
Keep an eye open for a wide range of interesting fungi including scarlet elfcup, fly agaric, red-cracking bolete and shaggy scalycap that thrive in this diverse woodland.
The statement in sentence (12) is based on the fact drunk singing could be heard; the passerby thereby concluded that the some fly agaric had been left in the house and was eaten by the girl of the spirit of the house, who then became intoxicated.
It doesn't help that Babylen has been dabbling in some pretty serious mind-altering substances along the way, including fly agaric and LSD, as he seeks communion with the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar.
According to scientist Andrew Haynes, reindeer deliberately eat the mind-bending fly agaric fungi to escape the monotony of winters.
The Chief Steward held his fly agaric. Telimena walked empty-handed.
More dangerous examples are fly agaric, mandrake, deadly nightshade and henbane.
The Amanita seems to retain some of its "fly agaric" connotations from its near universal use as a fly-catcher, with the names haitori(-goke), haitori-take given to it due to its fly stunning chemicals (Imazeki 1973).
The fly agaric mushroom is another hallucinogenic fungus (see Figure 21-8).
7 Destroying angel, death cap and fly agaric are all poisonous species of what?
CLOSE VIEW: 12-year-old Mark Cumberledge tracks down some colourful fly agaric Picture by MARK PINDER
FRUITS OF THE FOREST - Mark Cumberledge tracks down some colourful fly agaric fungus PICTURE: MARK PINDER
Siberians, for instance, really do have a history of consuming fly agaric mushrooms not only directly but also "distilled via human kidneys." Letcher speculates that they discovered the psychoactive properties of the mushroom itself and the urine excreted by people who have eaten it by observing the antics of reindeer, who in the winter supplement their meager diet of lichen by lapping up human urine, presumably for its mineral content.
Certainly there are drugs throughout the show, or rather, "drugs." Psychoactive mushrooms, either the Santa Claus caps of fly agaric or the more commonly consumed Psilocybe cubensis, are scattered throughout the museum--a scattering that becomes, in Roxy Paine's 1997 Psilocybe Cubensis Field, at once exuberant and creepy.