finger

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Synonyms for finger

Synonyms for finger

to bring the hands or fingers, for example, into contact with so as to give or receive a physical sensation

to establish the identification of

Synonyms for finger

the length of breadth of a finger used as a linear measure

one of the parts of a glove that provides covering for a finger or thumb

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feel or handle with the fingers

Synonyms

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examine by touch

Synonyms

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search for on the computer

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indicate the fingering for the playing of musical scores for keyboard instruments

References in periodicals archive ?
El fingere tschirnhausiano es tambien una propiedad del intelecto en cuanto facultad cognoscitiva distinta de la imaginacion, y cuya funcion es concipere sub forma actionis (28).
Vidi ego qui iuuenum miseros lusisset amores Post Veneris uinclis subdere colla senem Et sibi blanditias tremula componere uoce Et manibus canas fingere uelle comas.
Qui dicit verum non hoc dicendo laborat: Fingere falsa prius nititur, inde loqui.
The word has its roots in the Latin fingere, meaning to make in day, and is thus similar in meaning to the Greek poien, 'to make'.
The word figure, from the Latin figura or Old Latin fingere, literally means "to form.
fiction," from the Latin fingere, meaning an attempt to
Fiction can be traced to the Latin verb fingere, to form or mold (see Lausberg 220, para.
Fingere namque componere dicimus, unde et compositores luti figulos vocamus.
As some commentators have noted, (7) the Latin word fingere lies at the heart of the definition of possibility given in this passage: according to Spinoza, those things are possible whose existence we are able to feign.
Mater abest, digitis legem quae ponat, et ori, Et cogat tremulo murmure pauca loqui, Osculaque aridulis non continuanda labellis Carpere, quae juret barbara, quisquis amat, Et celare faces, et amici obtexere nomen, Multaque quae solers fingere discit Amor.
This is because the master tropes, indeed their very names in Latin and Greek, kept reminding poets, rhetoricians, and scientists of the semiotic offices of figurality or rhetoricality themselves: the roots fingere, fictio, figura all connote the imaginary shaping or fitting of linguistic entities as if they were contoured objects.
Now I'm thinking specifically of terms surrounding the "art" of the novel: "fiction" coming from the Latin fingere, "to touch"; "story" from historia which originally meant "wisdom"; "narrative" from narus, meaning "knowing.
Hemingway's make and do, incidentally, are reasonable translations for the Latin root of friction (fictio, fictus, past participle of fingere, to form).
The danger here is that not only will ambition be thwarted but a miserable life of austerity and abstention will also have been lived in vain: 'Se l'uomo non e veramente buono, ella e infelicissima e faticosa [via] sopra tutte, facendo tante cose e da tante altre astenendosi contra il proprio appetito: e il fingere lungamente e impossibile' (p.
At times be hard on yourself', te ipse coargue, inquire in te; accusatoris primum partibus fingere, deinde iudicis, novissime deprecatoris.