film


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Synonyms for film

cinema

Synonyms

adapt for the screen

Synonyms

  • adapt for the screen
  • make into a film

Synonyms for film

a thin coating or layer

a thin sheet of (usually plastic and usually transparent) material used to wrap or cover things

References in periodicals archive ?
In 2005, the 22-year entertainment veteran took the next step in fully serving black consumers: He launched Codeblack, an African American-owned company that acquires, produces, and distributes urban film content for the theatrical, television, home entertainment, Web, and mobile markets.
This fall the company will release the award-winning film Dirty Laundry, starring Loretta Devine and Rockmond Dunbar, in movie theaters across the nation.
German-based Nordenia has two film and converting plants in China and Malaysia.
also has film plants in China and Malaysia and imports certain commodity films from them to complement what it produces here.
Net profit participants are often a film's writer, "B-level" talent, the composer and in some cases, the cinematographer.
Debord's next film after Refutation was his second feature-length work, In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.
But it is a summer film, so I had to wait for the summer of 2004 to shoot it and it took me a long time to complete it.
While short interruptions to the screening by the teacher were very valuable, lengthy interruptions of the film as a whole were counterproductive.
All these issues have been integral to re-shaping Arab cultural discourse in literature, poetry, visual arts, music, theater and film over the last fifteen years.
Moving Pictures Festival of Dance on Film and Video (Canada)
The ideal film would be totally clear yet able to significantly block unwanted solar heat and reduce glare.
I first want to note that I think there has been a slight misrepresentation of the original Shaft as a "blaxploitation" film. In Framing Blackness, Ed Guerrero points out that the blaxploitation films of the early 1970s underscored "Hollywood's insistence on stunting the development of a black political voice and emancipated consciousness" (97).
And imagine this: you are showing a film about the faltering and flowering faith lives of a handful of New Yorkers--an African American Muslim, an atheist Jew, a gay Christian, a born-again Buddhist--at a rural college to an audience of one thousand white Lutheran teenagers from church youth groups across the state of Minnesota.
A deep and abiding affection for quality film has united them and their Japanese associates under a corporate moniker that is as playfully evocative as it is pragmatic.