feverishness


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  • noun

Synonyms for feverishness

a rise in the temperature of the body

References in periodicals archive ?
Yet the atmosphere is relatively subdued; a tranquilizing feverishness pervades the black box theater.
The infamous resolution was finally repealed in 1991, but the feverishness of its resentment has yet to subside.
NSAIDs are effective for general cold symptoms like feverishness, headache, and not feeling well.
Ravel's Sonata, with it's extraordinary Blues section and Perpetual Motion is modern and catchy, full of admirable virtuoso writing, while the Tzigane contains dramatic tension and feverishness building to a great finale.
Symptoms of the disease, which can be spread through the air in tiny water droplets, include high temperature, feverishness and chills, coughs,muscle pains,headaches,pneumonia, mental confusion and diarrhoea.
What has rain washed away?" This is a miraculously searing and necessary volume, seemingly and seamlessly resurrecting a woman's lost poems, her body and soul's longings and feverishness. Both Dubrow and Lewin are credible visionaries, the latter, an unconventional though orthodox and Old World Jew, foresees the future darkness of the Shoah: "Someone had seen the bird again, / that crane we call December--/ ...
A double blind study has shown that significant improvements from shivering (feverishness) was achieved in patients with common cold at day 4 of treatment with standardized extract of A paniculata (Kan Jang; 1200 mg/day).
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) consists of debilitating fatigue often associated with arthralgias, myalgias, chills, feverishness, and lymphadenopathy.
They include: high temperature, feverishness and chills; cough; muscle pains; headache; very occasionally diarrhoea and signs of mental confusion.
Despite the occasional feverishness of the Canadian language debate, the game, since the publication of 2006 census data, has been to present the most reasonable or measured reading possible, especially as concerns the future of French in Quebec.
The systematic barring of certain objects such as nail clippers or Swiss Army knives, while ordinary nylon string, pens, or credit cards might prove more dangerous, betrays a degree of feverishness among public authorities, who remain in a frightened defensive stance.