federalism

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Words related to federalism

the idea of a federal organization of more or less self-governing units

References in periodicals archive ?
Although the contemporary United States does not qualify according to Weingast's definition, it is one of the more federalistic nations.
The theft of the lock, as Faulkner's federalistic philosophy suggests, is a serious business.
7) The answer is that "an enormous tradition of federalistic rhetoric," from the framing of the Constitution to present-day Supreme Court doctrine, supports the "legitimacy and desirability" of state courts having a significant role in explicating federal constitutional norms.
Of course Ticino is Swiss, but like anywhere else in this most federalistic of nations, the local always takes the upper hand over the national.
123) Moreover, "because there are few interest groups to derail feel-good, do-something federal crime bills, the Court may [have] sense[d] that it alone [was] left to confront Congress" through the "institutional equilibrium" of a federalistic jurisprudence.
see also Dreisbach, A Lively and Fair Experiment, supra note 3, at 231 (observing that "[c]onventional and common sense rules of interpretation suggest that the interpretation of a constitutional provision begin with an examination of, first, the text and, second, the deliberations of the body that drafted and adopted it"); Conkle, supra note 6, at 1142 ("The language of the fourteenth amendment, coupled with the federalistic motivation for the establishment clause, make it exceedingly difficult to argue that the framers and ratifiers of the fourteenth amendment intended to incorporate the establishment clause for application against the states.
It would be excessive to claim that fully co-equal bicameralism would alone solve the Canadian and Indian separatist problems, but it seems to me equally excessive to hold out Canada and India as paragons of federalistic harmony and good feeling