extravagance

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  • noun

Synonyms for extravagance

Synonyms for extravagance

something costly and unnecessary

Synonyms for extravagance

the quality of exceeding the appropriate limits of decorum or probability or truth

the trait of spending extravagantly

References in periodicals archive ?
According to an ASAE industry research study that examined the perks of nearly 800 CEOs from associations of all types and sizes, few (if any) CEOs receive such extravagancies.
Both of his previous novels were equally ambitious, but each was flawed by extravagancies of plot and a failure to achieve palpable characters who lived and breathed like the rest of us.
sceptical, iconoclastic, analytical yet [sic] brilliantly perceptive, he fuelled the Chief of the Defence Staff with the ideas that were to shape Britain's policies over the next five years and acted as a brake on Mountbatten's impetuous extravagancies.
Once we admit this, we can immediately cut through tons of paper written on controversial issues such as determinism, paradigm commensurability, actors versus systems, postmodernism or constructivism versus positivism, and other extravagancies.
This state, I would argue has (interestingly) more in common with the condition of enlightenment than with the doctrines and extravagancies of the European aesthetic movement.
She was an Irish child growing up in that place on earth where Americans love to think that the faith remains pure and undefiled, whatever the excesses and extravagancies of Vatican II.
Another problem arose when the stewards failed to get round all those present for contributions; at the Norfolk feast in 1671 it was asserted that extravagancies were the usual concomitants of such festivals.
Let Christianity therefore be spared; it lends no aid to these extravagancies, any more than to those on the general subject of civil liberty'.
He described the poetry in such terms as `These contrasts, these extravagancies, these fluctuations and incoherencies, these half-formed or misshapen thoughts', and he called the poet himself `no ordinary phenomenon', a man `whose natural bent was towards the singular and solitary' (lxxii).
Indeed, the division between virtuous cavaliers and the scapegoat puritans is strengthened by the actions of the pseudo-cavalier Cutter, who, according to Cowley, shows "that the vices and extravagancies imputed vulgarly to the Cavaliers, were really committed by Aliens who only usurped that name.
We have parted with extravagancies that are above proprie ty, with incredibilities that are more acceptable than truth, and with fictions that are more valuable than reality.
In the playful extravagancies and 'postmodernist' excesses of Swift's imagination genres were saddled and straddled with all the cavalier brio of the satirist.
It was a city whose exaggerated backdrop was festooned with severe, gold-laden Louis XIV furniture and engraved, gem-studded portraits of Prince Eugene, exoticized extravagancies of the Far East and African continents.