exhaustible


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  • adj

Antonyms for exhaustible

capable of being used up

capable of being used up

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References in periodicals archive ?
XX exemptions (b) and (g), respectively, for protection of humans, animals and plant life, and conservation of exhaustible natural resources.
In this light, the book's weakest arguments are those based on supposedly exhaustible energy and resources.
Stability for investments and output expansion to flourish; Stability for economies around the world to grow; Stability to provide access to modern energy services for those currently without; and stability for producers that allows them a fair return from the exploitation of their exhaustible natural resources.
Contract notice: The Acquisition And Delivery Of Microcalorimetry And Its Analysis Device And Software () Computer To Complete The Research Undertaken In The Field Of Alternative Binders In Cement In Concrete, The Substitution Of Constituents Whose Resources Are Exhaustible By-Products Or Waste.
This will not only boost economic diversification, but also living standards while cutting dependency on exhaustible natural resources.
Acknowledge the need to take a risk sharing approach to the issue of price formation and pricing mechanism with the linkage to crude oil and its products for natural gas in long term contracts to ensure timely investment in the gas chain and recognize the need to reach a fair and reasonable price for natural gas taking into account the nature of natural gas as a non-renewable and exhaustible resource as well as its advantages in terms of energy efficiency and environmental premiums.
Qatar's public finances remain comfortable, but, with the drop in oil and natural gas prices, the portion of exhaustible resource revenues being saved may not be sufficient to maintain the same standard of living for future generations.
In this process, the government would be engaged in using an exhaustible resource--whose proceeds should be used to finish some 10,000 or more already unfinished development projects--to pay for needless mass consumption.
directly dependent upon exhaustible natural resources.
originally developed for studying exhaustible resources: the Hotelling
Raw materials are exhaustible, human knowledge grows with use.
The old Arabic saying goes 'contentment is an exhaustible treasure'.
Habib critically examines the claim that if one generation uses exhaustible resources, it should compensate future generations for that use by passing on an offsetting amount of value; Driver explores the vexed moral issues around carbon offsetting (in one of the first philosophical papers to do so).
The workhorse model dates back to 1931, when Harold Hotelling's classic paper studied a framework in which exhaustible resource owners can freely allocate the production of the resource across time.
Kurz and Salvadori present sixteen essays investigating the classical approach to value and distribution, exhaustible natural resources, and growth and technical progress, reflecting an ongoing discussion of the classical approach.