excrescence


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  • noun

Synonyms for excrescence

Synonyms for excrescence

(pathology) an abnormal outgrowth or enlargement of some part of the body

References in periodicals archive ?
It is of interest that up to two-thirds of PL patients are accompanied by bony alterations that include intralesional bone formation, periosteal reaction, osseous bowing, cortical erosion, or irregular osseous excrescence.
Changes in regulation in two distinct sectors, the energy market and securities (financial instruments), produced an excrescence of risk.
How long do you suppose the Americans would tolerate that excrescence on the west coast?
He even went so far as to claim that 'paintings are the ashes of my art', implying that the physical manifestation of his work was an irrelevant excrescence.
WILLIEWAUGHT (will-e-wawt) Chaucer's ribald term for a small hard excrescence on the male member [a deep draught of drink in Scotland]
How on earth can anyone have an affection for a politically-created excrescence like the West Midlands when it doesn't even have a cricket team, even if our county ground isn't, at present, officially in Warwickshire?
Zargani confesses that this cruel period indelibly marked his psyche: I am now more than sixty years old, and my life is divided into two unequal parts; those seven years of persecution have expanded out of proportion and become an excrescence of my soul, pushing aside half a century filled with the normal stages of life, confining them and all the various ordinary trials of a life into a tiny space.
The Lib Dems' Viscount Falkland - full name Lucius Edward William Plantagenet Cary - described the display as "a piece of corporate vandalism, a visual excrescence, which caused enormous distress to those of us who visited the park regularly each week and are now avoiding it.
Starting from an obvious excrescence in the transmitted text of Simplicius's treatment of the foundations of pre-Socratic atomism near the beginning of his Physics commentary, this paper excavates a Theophrastean correction to Aristotle's tendency to lump Leucippus and Democritus together: Theophrastus made application of the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] principle in the sphere of ontology an innovation by Democritus.
Moreover, Turner's analysis gives us a Shakespeare for whom investment, risk, and bonds are not a rhetorical excrescence of his art but a seminal principle.
The element of the grotesque, for example, is not to be found in the poet's text: it is an excrescence, put there to imitate The Merry.
In fact, the most interesting chapters, such as those on colonial architecture or on the Japanese attempt to cultivate a Japanese style brush painting, "Toyoga," as the proper "modern art" for Taiwan and then the Nationalist Government's attempts to extirpate this "foreign" excrescence, deals explicitly with a Taiwanese struggle against old and new colonial regimes.
Philosophically, the FDA system is an excrescence of Progressive and New Deal liberalism, based on the inherently flawed, constitutionally dubious assumption that government bureaucrats should dictate what drugs Americans are allowed to take.
The (de)part(ed) part, the decapitated head, is perhaps the very figure of figures, the figure par excellence, of a "transcendental excrescence," the (cuttable) head being a more or less elevated outgrowth of the body (of texts) of which it is not just a part, but which (via the effects of the proper name as a head or heading) it sets apart, partitions, divides or distinguishes, as that of which it is nonetheless a part.
A burl is an abnormal, wart-like excrescence on the trunk or branches of a tree," Constantine writes.