enlarge

(redirected from enlarging)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • phrase

Synonyms for enlarge

Synonyms for enlarge

Synonyms for enlarge

References in periodicals archive ?
The participants dialed digit-only numbers and digit-letter combination sequences (such as 800-MADISON) using the enlarging techniques.
They confirmed that the ratio of the heart's wet and dry weights remained roughly the same during fasting and digesting, so the heart was enlarging during digestion not by expanding with fluid but by adding muscle.
(10) Children present clinically with a slowly enlarging, painless mass.
(This was an aircraft application in which no excess weight was permitted.) The solution entailed greatly enlarging the two ends into which the metal was gated, thus allowing them to function as manifolds.
'All of them have better relations with Russia now than they did before they became members of Nato.' He added that the US hoped it could persuade Russian leadership there was no threat to Russia about Nato enlarging.
Enlarging the original image, changing the tones, reversing the shades of lights and darks, heightening or reducing the contrast of the scene all allow the student to make a statement.
As a biographer, Larson seeks not only to cast aside the darkness that presumably still obscures the lives of Toomer and Larsen (a strange intimation given the enlarging body of work on these two writers), but also to reveal the dark or African strain in the lives of two authors of mixed ancestry.
The task of planning the reconstruction of the area was given to Alvaro Siza, but the Portuguese Cultural Heritage Institute commissioned the French to take charge of reorganising and enlarging the existing Chiado museum of modern Portuguese art.
The fact that flow rate is directly related to the fourth power of sprue diameter demonstrates why enlarging sprues is a common way to get faster fill times.
Culture Wars(*) is a rare book in that it succeeds in both informing the reader and enlarging a debate that has become central not only to politics, but to such fundamental matters as dealings between man and woman, orthodox and secularist, and liberal and conservative.