effect


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Synonyms for effect

Synonyms for effect

Synonyms for effect

References in classic literature ?
But, as I have said, this was not the main thing that kept me from going to the Brazils, but that really I did not know with whom to leave my effects behind me; so I resolved at last to go to England, where, if I arrived, I concluded that I should make some acquaintance, or find some relations, that would be faithful to me; and, accordingly, I prepared to go to England with all my wealth.
Having thus settled my affairs, sold my cargo, and turned all my effects into good bills of exchange, my next difficulty was which way to go to England: I had been accustomed enough to the sea, and yet I had a strange aversion to go to England by the sea at that time, and yet I could give no reason for it, yet the difficulty increased upon me so much, that though I had once shipped my baggage in order to go, yet I altered my mind, and that not once but two or three times.
SAVAS, S., UGRAS, A., 2004, The effects of Training Programme for 8 weeks before the season on Male Boxing.
2 : the act of making a certain impression <The tears were only for effect.>
Even though a hormetic treatment may show only a small effect, Calabrese proposes that several treatments might be put together to achieve a therapeutic benefit.
However, to gain an overall summary picture of the heterogeneity of effect sizes we standardized all measures so that they were all on the same scale.
Although there seemed to be a minor effect on dry compression and minor variations in friability, there appeared to be little significant effect between sand samples mixed with the various water samples.
To address the problems associated with the null hypothesis inference testing model, psychology and related fields are starting to move in the direction of placing more emphasis on practical significance, the degree of relationship between variables, or the magnitude of the effect, instead of tests of statistical significance.
When means and standard deviations were available for field-trip and non-field-trip groups, effect size (d-index) was calculated using a modified Glass unbiased estimator (Hedges & Olkin, 1985).
It follows that the degree of equivalence [d.sub.i] = [x.sub.i] - [x.sub.R] = [x.sub.i] - y is the expected value of a state-of-knowledge distribution for the laboratory effect (bias) [X.sub.i] - Y for i = 1, 2,..., n, and the degree of equivalence [d.sub.i,j] = [x.sub.i] - [x.sub.j] is the expected value of a state-of-knowledge distribution for the difference [X.sub.i] - [X.sub.j] for i, j = 1, 2,..., n and i [not equal to] j.
In each of these markets, the Board has carefully considered whether other factors either mitigate the competitive effects of the proposal or indicate that the proposal would have a significantly adverse effect on competition in the market.
However, soy does not appear to have an estrogen-like effect on breast tissue, suggesting that it does not increase breast cancer risk.
Because the thoughts of susceptibility and severity tend to arouse fear and anxiety, health risk messages hold the potential to engender adverse reactions in which individuals defensively deny the health threat or engage in more risky behavior (i.e., "boomerang" effect) (e.g., Kleinot & Rogers, 1982; Rippetoe & Rogers, 1987; Rogers & Mewborn, 1976; Witte, 1992a).
* Frenic--a novel effect that shifts between two translucent colors when illuminated at different angles.