earlobe


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for earlobe

the fleshy pendulous part of the external human ear

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
This procedure restores earlobe length and shape while maintaining the natural rim of the lobule without notching.
Diagonal earlobe crease and coronary artery disease in a Chinese population.
Ear keloids, including keloids of earlobe and keloids of helix, can cause both cosmetic deformity and psychological trauma to the patient because of their highly visible location.
Position your thumb and forefinger in the same manner as on right earlobe.
We stumbled upon earlobe sensors when conducting the research and learned that sampling oxygen saturation levels at the earlobe isn't even a practice used in clinical settings anymore.
The company does a good deal of contract work for other brands and recently signed a deal to sell jewelry other than earlobe plugs in Urban Outfitters nationwide.
The earlobe had been picked up by a passerby and placed outside a shop and was later seized by officers searching the area.
In a large, long-term study, people who displayed three to four signs of aging, such as receding hairline at the temples, baldness at the crown of the head, earlobe creases or yellow fatty deposits around the eyelids had a 57 per cent increased risk of heart attack and a 39 per cent increased risk of developing heart disease, it was revealed.
David Kahn, 30-year veteran and pioneer in cosmetic surgery, “rounds out” his surgical abilities with a procedure for the modern job hunter: earlobe repair.
We hypothesized the motion-sensitive technology with the earlobe probe would provide the most valid PR readings.
Pierce was able to complete his flinging feat because earlobe skin can stretch and snap back to its original shape--much like a rubber band can.
If the school policy had said you're only allowed a stud in the earlobe then I would understand - but it's unclear.
This issue's research column is based on the peer-reviewed article by Fabrice Vallee, Joaquim Mateo, Guillaume Dubreuil, Thomas Poussant, Guillaume Tachon, Ingrid Ouanounou and Didier Payen, entitled: "Cutaneous Earlobe PCO2 at 37[degrees]C to Evaluate Micro Perfusion in Septic Patients.
Turn to page 36 to read the poem "A Rhino Has My Earlobe.