drunkard


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Synonyms for drunkard

Synonyms for drunkard

Synonyms for drunkard

References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus, who celebrates with people, they see as "a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners.
Titles like Meanwhile, At The Bar, A Drunkard Muses and The First Time You're Unfaithful should give you a good idea what we're talking about.
These words are spoken by Sydney Carton, a scruffy drunkard, who describes himself as someone who has never done any good and never will.
Another man found the drunkard there and called the firefighters, who rescued him from the toilet pit and took him to a hospital in Hohhot, the Inner Mongolia autonomous region, reports the China Daily.
She also is particularly concerned about the gender politics of the condemnation of men for abusing their patriarchal family roles with drink found within the drunkard narratives of the temperance movement.
Around 600AD the watchman Seithenyn, who was an unreliable drunkard, left the gates open and 16 villages were drowned.
Smith's play The Drunkard "was probably America's most successful play" before George Aiken's adaptation of Uncle Tom's Cabin succeeded it, and Uncle Tom was later shaken--albeit temporarily--from this perch by William W.
Lil, the daughter of a drunkard, awakes from a lifetime of drugs and the specter of past sexual abuse.
The report describes Sabini as "a drunkard and a man of most violent temperament with a heavy following and strong command of bullies of Italian origin and other undesirables
Jesus' opponents accused him of being a glutton and a drunkard because he enjoyed feasting (with the "wrong" kind of people).
Based on a careful reading of the drunkard narrative, "the central pillar of the temperance movement," Manhood Lost is a provocative, fascinating, and elegant book (4).
Relying on drunkard narratives and civil damage suits in particular, Parsons uses temperance reform to show how "Americans harbored serious concerns that individuals were so influenced and shaped by their environment that they had little control over their own character and actions" (4) and how they grappled with that predicament.
Historians now suspect that a drunkard 17th century friar who stole bones from the poet's tomb, or a 19th century anatomist who recorded that the skull disintegrated on contact with air but could have easily kept the skull for himself and replaced it with a damaged substitute, are behind the mystery.