dread


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Synonyms for dread

fear

Synonyms

  • fear
  • shrink from
  • be anxious about
  • flinch from
  • cringe at the thought of
  • quail from
  • shudder to think about
  • have cold feet about
  • anticipate with horror
  • tremble to think about

Synonyms for dread

to be afraid of

Synonyms

great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger

the emotion aroused by something awe-inspiring or astounding

Synonyms for dread

References in periodicals archive ?
You have to give it up to him because his dreads were so long and so gnarly.
The holiday nightmare can begin as soon as women set foot on the plane, with one in five saying they dread fitting into tight airline seats, according to the research for Slimming World.
1 : to fear or dislike greatly <He can't swim and dreads going into the water.
Yalom follows the usual American self-help book formula--a facile thesis [We all dread death] followed by skating around variations on the theme, illustrated by case histories that seem to me to be more grief/loss issues than death anxiety issues, and which, incidentally, are all written in the exact style of Dr.
Thompson contextualizes the emergence of apocalyptic dread as a conservative response to "rapid sociocultural changes over the last forty years" (7).
In her book Law, Sensibility and the Sublime in Eighteenth-Century Womens Fiction: Speaking of Dread, Sue Chaplin undertakes the intriguing project of accounting for articulations of dread in mid--to late eighteenth-century women's fiction.
That $900 electric bill he dreads opening every January isn't going to hurt nearly as much this time.
Brave knights," he said, "my daughter has been kidnapped by the dread dragon Lightning.
The findings suggest that dread derives, in part, from attention--and is not simply a fear or anxiety reaction.
Mikey Dread, gracing the stage at Hall Two, The Sage Gateshead.
It didn't help, she said, that her partner for many years would combat his own dread by "turning into Mary Lou Retton before we went on--he'd want to do backflips across the stage instead of partner me.
This dread and the added weight of not being what everyone thought her to be led to depression and full-blown panic attacks that began to cripple her emotionally.
As I came to this realization, I was filled with both excitement and dread.
A chapter needs to be added that includes why people dread some hazards (nuclear weapons, terrorism, handguns) and so their risk is amplified, whereas other hazards are much more tolerable to the public and to elected officials (tobacco, alcohol).
Is it one of those "dark places where one feels dread, where without knowledge of the horrors that occurred, there is a sinister and claustrophobic air"?