distressing


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Synonyms for distressing

Synonyms for distressing

Synonyms for distressing

causing distress or worry or anxiety

References in periodicals archive ?
Charge nurses should find time to discuss morally distressing patient care situations with their nursing staff.
The morally distressing situations described by Wilkinson (1987), Elpern et al.
Three hundred and thirty eight participants were recruited for the study; however only participants who endorsed a distressing SIT (n = 209) were included in the data analysis.
In lieu of a dedicated counselor, an organizational commitment to keep charge nurses without direct patient care responsibilities would allow the charge nurse time to round and discuss morally distressing patient care situations.
Goals include: (a) identifying life situations that increase distress, (b) reducing the scope of distressing emotions and their impact on coping efforts, (c) increasing the effectiveness of problem-solving coping efforts to manage problematic situations, and (d) teaching skills that will enable the cancer survivor to deal effectively with distressing emotions and anticipated problems.
While several factors contribute to the emotional distress of sexual harassment, such as the intensity and duration of the unwanted activity, the consequences of filing a formal complaint to authorities,' and so on, assessing the emotionally distressing properties of the activity itself should be part of the judicial process.
The researchers monitored the women for several indicators of emotional stress, including daily feelings of anxiety, chronic sources of anxiety, and distressing events such as financial set-backs or the death of a loved one.
The most distressing symptom was off time, followed by freezing gait, postural instability, sleep disturbance, and difficulty concentrating.
Even more distressing is the estimate that persons with spinal cord injury commit suicide two to six times more frequently than the general population (Frisbie & Kache, 1983; Geisler, Jousse, Wynne-Jones, & Breithaupt, 1983; Judd & Brown, 1992).
This observation is the latest in a series of reports linking distressing events in a person's life to depressed immune function (SN: 5/24/80, p.