disembarrass


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Synonyms for disembarrass

to free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable

Synonyms for disembarrass

References in periodicals archive ?
It was in this historical setting that The Liberal Imagination marked a turning point in American liberal thought--the point at which a chastened liberalism sought to disembarrass itself of the Soviet incubus.
42, at 264 (James Madison) (Clinton Rossiter ed., 1961)) (Supremacy Clause "disembarrassed" the Convention of the problem presented by the Articles of Confederation where "treaties might be substantially frustrated by regulations of the States").
at 213 (The treaty power "is disembarrassed by the plan of the convention, of an exception under which treaties might be substantially frustrated by regulation of the [s]tates.").
Madison, for example, wrote in The Federalist, defending the Constitution's treatymaking power, that the Constitution's "power[] to make treaties" was "comprised in the Articles of Confederation, with this difference only, that [it] is disembarrassed by the plan of the convention, of an exception under which treaties might be substantially frustrated by regulations of the States." (54) Of course, if the drafting debates indicated a contrary understanding on the part of some delegates, we would have to rethink this point.
Arnold's critical reputation has never really been fully disembarrassed of his Celticism excesses; however, these excesses can be better understood as an ethnic caricature of a social ideal.
How we "language" these all-consuming issues will encourage us to remap the topography of our disembarrassed realties and counter the devastating grip capitalism (and its "isms") holds when we are in the throes of authoring our world (Kosik, 1976; McLaren & Farahmandpur, 2005).
"disembarrassed" the treaty power from the limiting proviso in
It is to be remembered that Ruskin was for a long time now disembarrassed of his Christianity, and ready to see it as one phase of myth.
Her diagnosis is "the usual psychosomatic imbalance" that makes her "ordinary as / humble pie." Nonetheless, she concludes, "There was much wrong / and you are mistaken to deny / your body's faithful articulation" ("Disembarrassed" 74).
Both of them are comprised in the Articles of Confederation, with this difference only, that the former is disembarrassed by the plan of the convention, of an exception under which treaties might be substantially frustrated by regulations of the states.(192) Similarly, with respect to restrictions on the states, Madison observed that "[t]he prohibition against treaties, alliances, and confederations makes a part of the existing articles of Union; and for reasons which need no explanation, is copied into the new Constitution."(193) With respect to letters of marque and reprisal, he continued: