depreciation


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  • noun

Synonyms for depreciation

Synonyms for depreciation

a lowering in price or value

Synonyms for depreciation

References in periodicals archive ?
TEI commends the IRS and Treasury for seeking to simplify the section 861 rules by adopting an alternative tax book value method for depreciation expense.
Using this model, the sum can be compared to depreciation. Deviations from depreciation of plus or minus 10% are worth examining.
Sansing (1998) shows that the value of one dollar of depreciation-related DTL is equal to [delta]/([delta] + [rho]) dollars, where [delta] is the rate of tax depreciation and [rho] is the discount rate.
However, Betz argues that the data suggest bonus depreciation does not have much of an effect.
Even foreign investors, whom everyone expected to swoop in to pick up stocks in the event of rupee depreciation, have continued to keep their sangfroid.
'The move (depreciation)...will also help increase remittances as those who had chosen to send money back home via illegal hundi/hawala system should now rely on proper banking channels to enjoy a higher exchange rate,' Lawai said.
When properly applied, ARM suggests that component depreciation may be preferable because it likely "will result in a more accurate determination of depreciation and will facilitate accounting when the component is replaced." Its use in the United States, however, appears to be primarily motivated by tax benefits.
Taxpayers will have to determine separately if real property improvements are eligible for bonus depreciation and what their applicable recovery period is (generally 15 or 39 years for nonresidential real property).
Before the PATH Act, qualified property for bonus depreciation under Sec.
"Everyone is looking to slow down depreciation, not speed it up."
Negative adjustments of value can be: permanent adjustments, hereinafter referred to as depreciation and / or temporary adjustments referred to as adjustments for depreciation or impairment, according to the permanent or temporary nature of this adjustment.
Depreciation is a deductible expense, based on the notion that everyday wear and tear on a property should be recognized ratably over the expected useful life of that property.
The Tax Relief Act of 2010 increases the 50% bonus depreciation to 100%.