deport

(redirected from deportable)
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Synonyms for deport

deport yourself

Synonyms

  • behave
  • act
  • conduct yourself
  • hold yourself
  • carry yourself
  • acquit yourself
  • bear yourself
  • comport yourself

Synonyms for deport

to force to leave a country or place by official decree

to conduct oneself in a specified way

Synonyms for deport

hand over to the authorities of another country

expel from a country

References in periodicals archive ?
(112) See Beiliss, supra note 91, at 57-63 (explaining how to determine whether a crime is a crime involving moral turpitude, aggravated felony, and other deportable offenses); USDOJ-OIL MONOGRAPH, supra note 89, app.
First came the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigration Responsibility Act of 1996, which banned new immigrants with green cards from receiving government benefits such as Social Security, increased border security and penalties for immigration fraud, and dramatically expanded the list of deportable offenses.
Many offenses including sexual ones, are already deportable offenses under Act 237 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, but the awa, adhering to public sentiment about sex offenders and immigrants goes one step further.
The court blocked the first three provisions--seeking work, not carrying papers or committing deportable crimes--on the grounds they were preempted by federal law.
Therefore it found that Congress included tax evasion in clause (ii) to ensure that it was a deportable offense and not to remove all other tax crimes from the scope of clause (i).
A convicted deportable criminal can be deported earlier--that is, before serving his full sentence here--if he was convicted of a nonviolent offense and if an appropriate official (the attorney general or the chief of the state prison system) requests such an earlier deportation.
permanently so long as they do not become inadmissible or deportable,
In 1991 when Lora was convicted, just like today, conviction for a controlled substances offense rendered a non-citizen deportable. The version of the statute that existed at the time plainly provided that any non-citizen convicted of a controlled substances offense "at any time after entry ...
Secure Communities began in 2008 when Congress approved the funding to "improve and modernize efforts to identify aliens convicted of a crime, sentenced to imprisonment, and who may be deportable, and remove them from the United States once they are judged deportable."
By contrast, the enforcement of the civil provisions, including the apprehension of deportable aliens, was viewed as a federal responsibility, with state and local police playing, at most, a supporting role.
You're still deportable - because you're not Jewish.
(15.) See supra note 1 and accompanying text (noting aggravated felon deportable under INA).
In the months leading up to IIRIRA's enactment, the legislative history confirms that the Act's jurisdiction-stripping provisions were created to make it easier to remove deportable noncitizens.
11 made any non-citizen who was ever found guilty of a broad set of crimes automatically deportable. Today, the criminal justice and immigration systems leave no room for the possibility of someone like James, who served time for selling drugs but had since become a respected worker whose life centered on his family, to stay in the country.