den

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Synonyms for den

Synonyms for den

a place used as an animal's dwelling

a hiding place

Synonyms for den

the habitation of wild animals

Synonyms

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a hiding place

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a unit of 8 to 10 cub scouts

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a room that is comfortable and secluded

References in classic literature ?
Den I finish my cases quick, und I say: 'Let us go to your house und get a trink.' He laugh und say: 'Come along, dry mans.'
Den Bertran laugh and say, 'Fi dond' shust as if it was a glass broken upon der table; und Bimi come nearer, und Bertran was honey-sweet in his voice and laughed to himself.
Here where the tarantula's den is, riseth aloft an ancient temple's ruins--just behold it with enlightened eyes!
"Well, den, she ain't got no business to talk like either one er the yuther of 'em.
"WELL, den! Dad blame it, why doan' he TALK like a man?
And she went into the den next door, where another mother-lion lived, and told her all about it.
His door was barricaded by a set of ingenious bolts of his own invention, for the sieges were frequent by the neighbours when any unusually ambrosial odour spread itself from the den to the neighbouring studies.
"No, no; hang it, open." Tom gave a kick, the other bolt creaked, and he entered the den.
The keeper was so stupefied at this scene that he took Andrea by the hands and began examining his person, attributing the sudden submission of the inmates of the Lions' Den to something more substantial than mere fascination.
"I give you good den, sweet friends," quoth Little John, striding up to where they sat.
"Give thee good den, holy father," quoth the merry Beggar with a grin.
And if there were a contest, and he had to compete in measuring the shadows with the prisoners who had never moved out of the den, while his sight was still weak, and before his eyes had become steady (and the time which would be needed to acquire this new habit of sight might be very considerable) would he not be ridiculous?
I asked her if my betrothed lived here, and she answered, "Ah, you poor child, you are come to a murderers' den; your betrothed does indeed live here, but he will kill you without mercy and afterwards cook and eat you."'
"Holmes!" I whispered, "what on earth are you doing in this den?"
Tradition says she spent the last two years of her life in the strange den I have been speaking of, after having indulged herself in one final, triumphant, and satisfying spree.