denotative

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Synonyms for denotative

Synonyms for denotative

having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming

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in accordance with fact or the primary meaning of a term

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References in periodicals archive ?
The diminutive suffix -ce is when used denotatively encodes actual smallness of denotata: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [krace, legDIM), [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [stolce, chairDIM], [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [palce, thumbDIM], etc.
On occasion participants would misread it denotatively, but when that happened, other participants would be quick to correct them.
A word is used literally when it is used denotatively. When a word is used figuratively, it connotes other meanings according to how its users see and use it in different cultural contexts.
The research verbs: do, find, show, develop, examine, investigate, measure, observe, discover, prove and perform are mainly used denotatively. The examples given below illustrate the uses of some denotative verbs:
As part of the visual palimpsest thus formed, behind the man's fall a phantasmal image of his jump comes into the open, without being denotatively exposed in the picture.
The narration describes the scene denotatively with the phrase: "You suck your thumb ..." and almost immediately the shot ends.
What she means, more connotatively and allusively than denotatively, is that Shakespeare chose to dramatize stories already familiar to us from childhood.
A poem illustrative of "More Dangerous than Dying" at its best begins "The conflagration seemed severe//our first visit to church in 4 years," which depicts the speaker and his unnamed partner's uncharacteristic attending of a service and his perception of the congregation's response: "people piled onto each other/toppling pews picking children/from the floor." The poem goes on to describe the partner's response: "you grabbing my hand mouthing//screaming probably." This poem essentially follows the convention of a mind daydreaming while in the midst of something else, but unlike the Beatles' song with the line, "somebody spoke and I (went) into a dream," in which the transition is denotatively announced, here, it's a double-spaced couplet which does the framing.
3 [20061: 237-250) proves clever at applying several strands of contemporary literary theory to a consideration of the tensions that arise in Hopkins' "Spring and Fall." These tensions most of all appear, proclaims Wardi, when the poem seems to confute all "pathetic fallacy"--only eventually to identify with the poetized character Margaret as (even denotatively) "a flower in mourning" herself (p.
Though there was an article pertaining to Calgary, it did not denotatively mention the oil boom, stating only a "preliminary city planning scheme for Calgary ...
Lead couple Grace and Jim are furnished with as bare a back-story as Adam and Eve, while Bean incarnates the arch-demonic killer only denotatively, with none of the sexual charisma that made Hauer's performance so disturbing.
Similarly, whereas "yellow flower" may appear to be highly specific connotatively and denotatively, on the Internet, as noted above, it may be quite catholic.
The lack of "power" in the city refers, denotatively, to the simple loss of electricity, resulting in the inability to broadcast images.
(3) </pre> <p>Lillian BeVier writes: "Privacy is a chameleon-like word, used denotatively to designate a wide range of wildly disparate interests--from confidentiality of personal information to reproductive autonomy--and connotatively to generate goodwill on behalf of whatever interest is being asserted in its name." (4) Other commentators have lamented that privacy is "vague and evanescent," (5) "protean," (6) and suffering from "an embarrassment of meanings." (7) "Perhaps the most striking thing about the right to privacy," philosopher Judith Jarvis Thomson has observed, "is that nobody seems to have any very clear idea what it is." (8)