delude

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Synonyms for delude

Synonyms for delude

to cause to accept what is false, especially by trickery or misrepresentation

Synonyms for delude

References in periodicals archive ?
1-93), the Buddha conveys that what we deludedly perceive as self/other(s) should be understood instead as fleeting, interconnected processes that arise dependent upon ignorance, desire, attachment, the five aggregates, and the six sense bases.
A cure for this schizoid estrangement imbued with Borgesian irony is somehow recommended in the Postscript, where we are solicited to get a keener sense out of Costello's standing before unknown judges, trying to explain herself in a language that does not seem to be English any more: "is it a condition of existence in this place that all speak a common tongue, Esperanto for example, and are the sounds that issue from her own lips not, as she deludedly believes, English words but Esperanto words [.
The placatory ritual of submission is central to Venice Preserv'd, and its social archaeology is particularly well displayed at the end of the third act, when the conspirators rightly suspect Jaffeir, and want to kill him, until Pierre deludedly dissuades them.
Monsieur Chevalier, to whom Steve has become so attached that he deludedly believes himself the owner, is indeed Royal Ascot-bound after beating what turned out to be just two rivals at Windsor last Monday night.
But he never ridicules Christians for deludedly following a non-existent hero.
Bigger deludedly thinks that his violence will provide him with a "new life" (105), as Loeb also thought his crimes had given him a triumphant "new life" (Higdon 127), and liberated him from conventional morality.
They made us see that, disingenuously or deludedly, judges only professed to be complying with the command of inexorable bright-line rules.
Those with ego-protecting neuroses, who deludedly believe that all's right with them and their world, would shed their complacency.
A slightly mournful melody decorates the generally riotous scene that finds Malvolio deludedly dreaming of marriage to his mistress Olivia while Toby and Andrew comment gleefully on his preposterous infatuation.
Because people believe that where there is a difference there must be a distinction, and because it affords certain people the satisfaction of deludedly believing that they are using words more precisely than other people (even if those other people are Jane Austen and James Joyce).
Within mere minutes, she's given a job singing backup for a deeply untalented song thrush (who deludedly dismisses her supporting vocalists, to their faces, with a blithe, ``They don't matter'').