delirium


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Related to delirium: delirium tremens
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Synonyms for delirium

Synonyms for delirium

a usually brief state of excitement and mental confusion often accompanied by hallucinations

References in periodicals archive ?
Delirium Is at the Core of Pain, Agitation, and Delirium Triangle
Clinically, critical patients often experience severe pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD).
In patients with advanced cancer, delirium can be caused by various different factors.
This study follows on from an earlier study conducted by Elsayem and his colleagues in which they assessed the frequency of delirium in advanced cancer patients visiting the emergency department at MD Anderson.
We don't know whether taking steps to prevent postoperative delirium could also help prevent dementia -- but we need to find out," lead author Juraj Sprung of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, said in a (https://www.
People with confusion include: those with dementia; those with delirium - a sudden change in someone's cognitive state; those with delirium in addition to dementia; and people with undiagnosed dementia.
Not only is delirium under-recognized, but delirium also has many synonyms, such as ICU psychosis, postoperative cognitive impairment, metabolic encephalopathy, toxic encephalopathy, and altered mental status.
Patients were assessed for delirium byusing the DSM IV Criteria for diagnosis of Delirium.
Because dementia is a strong risk factor for developing delirium, (1) withdrawing or changing medications to rule out delirium in patients with mild dementia, such as Ms.
sup][1] Delirium is one of the presentations of SAE, and the other features include agitation, confusion, disorientation, hypersomnolence, stupor, and coma.
Delirium is an acute and fluctuating confusional state which can occur when someone is ill or injured; it is regarded as acute brain failure, where a person's brain no longer functions as it usually would.
Given the pervasiveness of delirium in geriatric patients across the health care system, its adverse outcomes, and the potential for effective clinical management, much attention has been devoted to the development of accurate clinical assessment of the condition.
A state of confusion, we now call delirium, can last weeks or months even after a mild illness.
Delirium is a serious neuropsychiatric condition that emerges acutely in all age groups, including infants, children, and adolescents.
Delirium is a preventable, life-threatening condition among the older population, and commonly occurs in hospitals (Christensen, 2014); the World Health Organization (2016) defines the older person to be an individual older than 60 years of age.