deconstructionism


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Related to deconstructionism: Deconstructivist architecture
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Synonyms for deconstructionism

a philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning

References in periodicals archive ?
Recording Reality, Desiring the Real is intended for audiences with deep backgrounds in and thorough understandings of critical theory, including but not limited to psychoanalysis, semiotics, deconstructionism, and others.
According to Foucault the birth and the development of discourses including constructionism and deconstructionism in western history indicates that there are certain historical a prior condition that determines not only the growth of discourses but also the problems in which these discourses engage and the solutions they propose to resolve them.
In general, philosophical work by Derrida claims that deconstructionism is the common statements both in scientific works and everyday language.
Derrida's philosophical deconstructionism is intensely skeptical of the notion of presence, and this skepticism informed his understanding of the religious:
Berend explains deftly the impact of postmodernism and deconstructionism on contemporary historiography as evidenced in the work of Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, and Jean-Francois Lyotard.
Picchione also warns scholars of the dangers of post-structuralism, deconstructionism, and reader-response criticism, which "riduce ogni ricerca epistemologica alla sfera della retorica" (402).
From Deconstructionism to Constructivism and the Uses of Sovereignty
This book is a useful guide to the work of New Zealand historians who followed the post-structuralist turn away from teleology and essentialism; but deconstructionism has now settled into a routine.
Her language moves between sensuality and deconstructionism in a luscious interplay between the abstract and the corporeal.
Mikics states that in this respect deconstructionism is instructive because it demonstrates the incompatibility between the limitless meanings and textual abstractions advocated by Derrida and a society characterised by human dignity and ethical responsibility.
Scientific research can be questioned by chaos theory, and deconstructionism.
The book occasioning all this technical wizardry certainly couldn't be termed an easy read, but with a little background reading on concepts such as deconstructionism and postmodernism, the slim volume, only 83 pages including a sizeable essay by Nayla Tamraz, is certainly accessible to the lay reader.
William Deresiewiez, a former professor of English at Yale University and a contributing writer at The Nation, says that the rising group of literary Darwinists is seeking to dethrone the "abstrusiosities" of deconstructionism, social theory, and psychoanalysis that have reigned in English literature departments for the past few decades.
s use of Derridean deconstructionism, with its call for mourning secular futures, is a tour de force that paves the way for articulating new frameworks that go beyond the limitations of democracy, providing new insights and approaches for dealing with the concerns of minorities who often find themselves marginalized within existing democratic frameworks.
The quicker we leave blank-slate theories behind us, and the quicker we expel the anti-rationalistic and anti-scientific ethos of post-structuralism, deconstructionism etc.