deal


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Synonyms for deal

deal in something

Synonyms

deal with something

Synonyms

deal with something or someone: handle

deal with something or someone: behave towards

Synonyms

  • behave towards
  • handle
  • act towards
  • conduct yourself towards

Synonyms for deal

to engage in the illicit sale of (narcotics)

Synonyms

to mete out by means of some action

deal with: to be occupied or concerned with

deal with: to behave in a specified way toward

Synonyms

an indefinite amount or extent

Synonyms

an act or state of agreeing between parties regarding a course of action

an agreement, especially one involving a sale or exchange

something offered or bought at a low price

Synonyms for deal

a particular instance of buying or selling

an agreement between parties (usually arrived at after discussion) fixing obligations of each

Synonyms

a plank of softwood (fir or pine board)

Related Words

wood that is easy to saw (from conifers such as pine or fir)

Synonyms

Related Words

the cards held in a card game by a given player at any given time

the type of treatment received (especially as the result of an agreement)

the act of distributing playing cards

the act of apportioning or distributing something

take into consideration for exemplifying purposes

take action with respect to (someone or something)

Related Words

behave in a certain way towards others

direct the course of

give out as one's portion or share

give (a specific card) to a player

References in classic literature ?
And that makes you-all dead easy in this deal of mine.
Speaking of deals," he said, "reminds me of a poker game I once seen in Reno, Nevada.
Say,' he whispers, 'I seen the dealer deal hisself four aces.
Ryde preach a great deal more about that spiritual part of religion that you talk of, Adam?
I've heard a deal o' doctrine i' my time, for I used to go after the Dissenting preachers along wi' Seth, when I was a lad o' seventeen, and got puzzling myself a deal about th' Arminians and the Calvinists.
But I herewith discharge my conscience, and declare that I have had quite enthusiastic movements of admiration towards old gentlemen who spoke the worst English, who were occasionally fretful in their temper, and who had never moved in a higher sphere of influence than that of parish overseer; and that the way in which I have come to the conclusion that human nature is lovable--the way I have learnt something of its deep pathos, its sublime mysteries--has been by living a great deal among people more or less commonplace and vulgar, of whom you would perhaps hear nothing very surprising if you were to inquire about them in the neighbourhoods where they dwelt.
Suppose a marriage, and the husband has ONLY $1,000 for his pocket, this would bring down the ways and means to $2,000 per annum; or less than a hundredth part of the expense of keeping ONE pocket-handkerchief; and when you come to include rent, fuel, marketing, and other necessaries, you see, my dear Miss Monson, there is a great deal of poetry in paying so much for a pocket-handkerchief.
There is a vast deal of difference in memories, as well as in everything else, and therefore you must make allowance for your cousin, and pity her deficiency.
From about the time of her entering the family, Lady Bertram, in consequence of a little ill-health, and a great deal of indolence, gave up the house in town, which she had been used to occupy every spring, and remained wholly in the country, leaving Sir Thomas to attend his duty in Parliament, with whatever increase or diminution of comfort might arise from her absence.
Yes, it does give a notion," said Catherine warmly, "and that is, that you all drink a great deal more wine than I thought you did.
This declaration brought on a loud and overpowering reply, of which no part was very distinct, except the frequent exclamations, amounting almost to oaths, which adorned it, and Catherine was left, when it ended, with rather a strengthened belief of there being a great deal of wine drunk in Oxford, and the same happy conviction of her brother's comparative sobriety.
Yes, I went to the pump-room as soon as you were gone, and there I met her, and we had a great deal of talk together.
A vast deal indeed; she hardly talked of anything else.
In Italy he drinks a little too much wine, and in Germany he drinks a great deal too much beer.
It is the assertion, the development, the product of those very different indispensable qualities of poetry, in the presence [8] of which the English is equal or superior to all other modern literature--the native, sublime, and beautiful, but often wild and irregular, imaginative power in English poetry from Chaucer to Shakespeare, with which Professor Minto deals, in his Characteristics of English Poets (Blackwood), lately reprinted.