curvaceousness


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  • noun

Synonyms for curvaceousness

the quality of having a well-rounded body

References in periodicals archive ?
(Notoriously, the white marble cladding of the Finlandia Hall, his last masterpiece, failed.) And then there is the seeming arbitrariness of many of his forms, an arbitrariness which, although possibly explicable in psychological terms, is different from the oddness of expressionism and the curvaceousness of art nouveau.
Wanneer die kleinseun vir hom 'n ui-horlosie kry, 'n plantaardige tydmeter (soos die reendruppels later uiekleurige horlosietjies is), is dit 'n toekeer tot natuurorde, tot li--"to the dancing curvaceousness of nature" (Watts, 1975:46, 6; vgl.
Bob Robinson and Joe and Pete Whyman, from Stratford-upon-Avon, marvel at Curvaceousness, a futuristic concept bike designed by Cory Ness from America.
The triumphant birth of baby Lila Grace, came after the uncommon curvaceousness of pregnancy.
Its curvaceousness, solidity, its caressable surface,
It had none of the matey curvaceousness of teenage acne.
Consider Barber's example of whether men consider curvaceousness (plumpness) or slenderness in women to be attractive.
All three observer groups tended to only change their shape slightly in their estimated body morph, and all three groups increased the 'curvaceousness' of their ideal body shape relative to their actual body shape.
Our eyes, indeed, with their focus upon curvaceousness, may feel as if they have withdrawn partway into our heads after an attractive woman has passed by--the way a frog's do when he swallows a fly.
Female bodybuilding poses an even greater threat to traditional notions of masculinity and male dominance since strength, muscularity, leanness, and hardness define male bodies; while weakness, lack of muscularity, curvaceousness, and softness define the female body.
These findings are consistent with those reported by Silverstein, Perdue, Peterson, and Kelly (1986) who examined the curvaceousness of models appearing in Vogue and Ladies Home Journal from 1901 to 1981 and of popular movie actresses from 1941 to 1979.