credits


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to credits

a list of acknowledgements of those who contributed to the creation of a film (usually run at the end of the film)

References in classic literature ?
There was never any let-up in his turning the thumb-screws of extended credit and economy.
If any of them get stuck, you go around yourself and guarantee their credit with the butchers and grocers.
I have tried in vain to get a licence upon credit at the Post Office;" said Pickles.
Tabitha Twitchit immediately raised the price of everything a half-penny; and she continued to refuse to give credit.
How can it ever possess either energy or stability, dignity or credit, confidence at home or respectability abroad?
As the count's title sounded on his ear he rose, and addressing his colleagues, who were members of one or the other Chamber, he said, -- "Gentlemen, pardon me for leaving you so abruptly; but a most ridiculous circumstance has occurred, which is this, -- Thomson & French, the Roman bankers, have sent to me a certain person calling himself the Count of Monte Cristo, and have given him an unlimited credit with me.
It was not true business principle to allow credit to a strong- bodied young fellow of the working-class who was too lazy to work.
His mind--such as it was--was fixed on her trying to steal, and he credited her at once with making use of this new opportunity.
To appeal to wealthy friends in the City would be to let those friends into the secret of his embarrassments, and to put his credit in peril.
They are not wise who give to themselves the credit due to others.
"This," says he, "is to my bankers, the British Linen Company, placing a credit to your name.
I said these words did him extreme credit, but that he must not throw away the imperishable distinction of being the first man to descend an Alp per parachute, simply to save the feelings of some envious underlings.
"You know that I am anxious to have that commission of lady of honor, which I have been foolish enough to ask of you, and you do not use your credit."
It is not uncommon for people who are much better fed and taught than Christopher Nubbles had ever been, to make duties of their inclinations in matters of more doubtful propriety, and to take great credit for the self-denial with which they gratify themselves.
Considering the man as an intruder on their business, whose success might deprive them of the credit and reward of making the discovery, they took advantage of their superiority in numbers, and of their being first in the field, and carefully misled the stranger before they ventured any further with their own investigations.