credence

(redirected from credences)
Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for credence

Synonyms for credence

mental acceptance of the truth or actuality of something

Synonyms for credence

the mental attitude that something is believable and should be accepted as true

a kind of sideboard or buffet

Synonyms

References in classic literature ?
For example we burst a tyre within a mile of Credence Green, and, to save time, walked into the beautifully kept little village.
Only an initiated few spend their holidays at Credence Green, and they have trained the householders to keep the place select.
If all these tokens are not enough to vindicate the truth of what I say, here is my sword, that will compel incredulity itself to give credence to it."
The tale, however, towards the close of their lengthened lives, did not meet with the full credence that had been accorded to it by those who remembered the ancient lustre of the gem.
Sarah Moss argues that degrees of belief, or credences, can amount to knowledge in much the way that full beliefs can.
The account I develop in this section makes free use of the idea of assigning credences to normative propositions.
I shall assume that we have an adequate account of probability as degree of belief, Carnap's [probability.sub.1], which following Lewis I shall call 'credence', and I shall assume that reasonable credences obey some version of the usual mathematical formulation of the laws of probability.
For ordinary, non-undermining As, on the other hand, NP seems to introduce a serious complexity into our credences. The conditional probability [P.sub.tw](A|[T.sub.w]) is equal to [P.sub.tw](A[T.sub.w])/[P.sub.tw]([T.sub.w]), a quotient of quantities that are strange and uncalculable at best.(6) [P.sub.tw]([T.sub.w]) is the probability, as calculated from the theory [T.sub.w] itself, of the truth of [T.sub.w].
Many philosophers contest the use of standard real numbers for the probability function that represents an agent's credences. They point out that leal numbers cannot capture the distinction between certain extremely unlikely events and impossible ones--they are both represented by credence 0, which violates the "regularity" principle.
For short: they serve our values according to our credences.
Probabilism is the view that a rational agent's credences should always be probabilistically coherent.
Frederic's beliefs can be represented by a probability function C which distributes credences, summing to 1, over the worlds.
The objects of credence are the entities to which credences are assigned for the purposes of a successful theory of credence.