crabbiness


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  • noun

Synonyms for crabbiness

a disposition to be ill-tempered

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References in periodicals archive ?
At times my ATM exhibited symptoms such as obsessiveness, crabbiness, fatigue, and a general mental fog.
But in the case of "The Stone Verdict," the stone as symbol of anger has been transformed: it becomes a token of acceptance of his father's silence, disdain, and crabbiness, a sign of absolution.
Despite the significant risk of mortality, the lesions can produce vague, nonspecific findings such as vomiting or crabbiness. Neurosurgical consultants should assess whether to evacuate the fluid.
By contrast, Movie Wars is a sustained polemic, with all the crabbiness that implies.
Symptoms of nasal stuffiness, post nasal drip, headaches, and behavioral change (crabbiness, negativity).
Acknowledging all this about Krieger's book helps me understand my resistance to it: perhaps the very soreness of the issues she addresses is at least one source for my crabbiness about the bleakness of her conclusions or the heaviness of her prose.
Samuelson argues that this crabbiness is a signal that the age of entitlement is ending.
The avocado green of a nurse's stockings, the potbelly and craggy voice of his neighbor, the puffy crabbiness of another middle-aged nurse, the ongoing black-market activities and bribes - all is important, for observing is the only act a patient still controls.
This psychological effect of a terrific month of sales is so salubrious that one wonders how much of the crabbiness in this world is due to business owners who are in a foul mood because their companies are enduring another month of so-so sales.
Although reinvented amidst the prevailing crabbiness about public disorder, such coupon programs were promulgated originally by Victorian charity organizers.
And beyond folly: isolation, crabbiness, self-doubt, sometimes contortions of the spirit, recalling those sweet, crabby apples Sherwood Anderson described in "The Book of the Grotesque." But risk, of course, is also zest, freedom, a breach on the unknown.
Despite the crabbiness of my strictures, I am happy that the book is now accessible to English readers.
While some of those aspects might be uncomfortably similar to our own (Lucy's crabbiness, Sally's selfishness, even Pig Pen's messiness), it is his understanding of, and compassion for, our strengths and weaknesses as a species that resonate so forcefully among numerous readers.