courtesan

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Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

a woman who cohabits with an important man

References in periodicals archive ?
Gustav Cross argues that Freevill is "Montaigne's 'natural man,' forerunner of the libertine or hontzete homme who features so largely in later seventeenth-century literature." See Gustav Cross, "Marston, Montaigne, and Morality: The Dutch Courtezan Reconsidered," English Literary History 27 (1960): 36.
Horace, Catullus, Tibullus, and Anacreon are brilliantly illustrated in Rachel's Lysisca [sic] - she is Lalage, Lydia, Lesbia, Lais - the ideal of the Greek and Roman courtezan!
numbers will be to John Marston, "The Dutch Courtezan," in
Allen Carroll (Chapel Hill, NC, 1974), p.75; John Marston, The Dutch courtezan, II, i; Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, Philaster, [II, ii].
In his best work, The Malcontent (1604) and The Dutch Courtezan, his satiric power is couched in a dramatic structure that, if not extraordinary, is at least adequate.
The first and second plays of the group exemplify illicit desire principally in the adulterous relationship of Queen Margaret and her lover, the Duke of Suffolk, whereas the initial play toys satirically with a xenophobic conception of Joan of Arc as a "strumpet" (1.5.12) and "shameless courtezan" (3.2.45) who fraudulently claims to be a virgin of noble birth.
In the same collection, The Rae of Courtezans and their Enamorato's, A New Ballad (London: F.
Courtezans (vivaciously represented by Alexandra Tennant and Laura Menzie) are enticingly dressed as flappers, courtesy of Kathleen Doyle's candy-coated costuming.
'When a person unacquainted with the Town passes at night thro' any of our principal streets he is apt to wonder whence the vast body of Courtezans, which stand ready ...
As to the famous, or rather infamous courtezans of antiquity, such as Lais, Thais, Lamia, Messalina, and many others of the same lewd function, they are all absolutely excluded from this collection; as a recital of their vicious and immoral lives, without the appearance of one virtue to speak for them, would rather serve to corrupt the minds than afford any useful instruction for the conduct or behaviour of the modest part of the fair sex.