courage

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Synonyms for courage

Synonyms for courage

Synonyms for courage

References in classic literature ?
"Dispense with all the moral courage you can," I said briskly.
I know,--I can see it--you have, among other ways, been used to managing people with your eyes, letting your moral courage speak out through them, as it were.
The city will be courageous in virtue of a portion of herself which preserves under all circumstances that opinion about the nature of things to be feared and not to be feared in which our legislator educated them; and this is what you term courage.
And this sort of universal saving power of true opinion in conformity with law about real and false dangers I call and maintain to be courage, unless you disagree.
But I agree, he replied; for I suppose that you mean to exclude mere uninstructed courage, such as that of a wild beast or of a slave-- this, in your opinion, is not the courage which the law ordains, and ought to have another name.
"You have plenty of courage, I am sure," answered Oz.
"I shall really be very unhappy unless you give me the sort of courage that makes one forget he is afraid."
"Very well, I will give you that sort of courage tomorrow," replied Oz.
The immeasurable devotion which he laid at her feet, in the days that were yet to come--the unyielding courage which cheerfully accepted the sacrifice of himself when events demanded it at a later period of his life--struck root in him now.
"The girl is doing what is best and most becoming in her position--and is doing it with a patience and courage wonderful to see.
But one day will the solitude weary thee; one day will thy pride yield, and thy courage quail.
Meanwhile, I had not the courage to go near my club, and the Temple was a place where I was accosted in every court, effusively congratulated on the marvellous preservation of my stale spoilt life, and invited right and left to spin my yarn over a quiet pipe!
"I will prevent it," said the gentleman; and going over to Don Quixote, who was insisting upon the keeper's opening the cages, he said to him, "Sir knight, knights-errant should attempt adventures which encourage the hope of a successful issue, not those which entirely withhold it; for valour that trenches upon temerity savours rather of madness than of courage; moreover, these lions do not come to oppose you, nor do they dream of such a thing; they are going as presents to his Majesty, and it will not be right to stop them or delay their journey."
During the delay that occurred while the keeper was opening the first cage, Don Quixote was considering whether it would not be well to do battle on foot, instead of on horseback, and finally resolved to fight on foot, fearing that Rocinante might take fright at the sight of the lions; he therefore sprang off his horse, flung his lance aside, braced his buckler on his arm, and drawing his sword, advanced slowly with marvellous intrepidity and resolute courage, to plant himself in front of the cart, commending himself with all his heart to God and to his lady Dulcinea.
Be satisfied, sir knight, with what you have done, which leaves nothing more to be said on the score of courage, and do not seek to tempt fortune a second time.