coterie

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Synonyms for coterie

Synonyms for coterie

a particular social group

Synonyms for coterie

References in periodicals archive ?
"Critics, Coteries, and Pre-Raphaelite Celebrity" sheds new light on Victorian discourses on sexuality and masculinity through a thick description of literary bravado, the emotions of male bonding within cliques, and homoerotic frissons among the creators and reviewers of Pre-Raphaelitism.
Such proceedings should also be initiated against Nawaz Sharif, Maryam Nawaz and their coteries', she stated.
In the name of soul-searching and introspection, the coterie will only advice the family to lie low for some time and immunise themselves from the chorus of miss governance, corruption, price rise and wait for the opportune moment.
In figure 9, we note that when the number of transactions is significantly higher than the number of nodes, the average load of coteries increase, otherwise the load is variable.
Her most ambitious claim is that by virtue of their marginality to institutions of church and state, 'women writers cast a series of overlapping circles of intimacy and extra-state exchange--the religious meeting, the poetic coterie, the extended family--as the material base and ideological model for public debate'.
"I want to bring to your notice massive corruption - with the money involved amounting to 15 billion rupees- by Musharraf's coteries posted to NAB and PCBL.
Kierkegaard eschewed the elitism of the Romantic and did not seek acceptance by the coteries of culture.
Prairie dogs live in social breeding groups called "coteries," usually composed of about four adults and their juvenile and subadult offspring (King 1955; Hoogland 1995).
He says entomologists have suspected that vibratory papillae may have a signaling role, and that caterpillars actively recruit protective coteries of ants rather than simply waiting for them to arrive.
The Washington Monthly and Human Events may well be fine publications, influential among their respective coteries, but it would probably be good, just as a backup, to talk to some actual politicians (or even voters) as well.
To discuss Stuart coteries, Schleiner emphasizes the development of wit and gossip in allusions to Ben Jonson, John Donne, and Anne Southwell as players of "conceited newes," a game based on sententiae and rhetorical balancing.
Now you can also fear (and with perfectly good reason, too): biological weapons and nerve gas in the subways, terrorist bombings in your office building, the AIDS virus the Ebola virus the flesh-eating streptococcus bacilli and a host of other retroviruses emerging from the rapidly deforested jungles of the world, coteries of right-wing wackos running shadow governments within the actual government, elected officials in the pocket of who knows what corporate interests, a worthless dollar backed up by nothing but faith and free-falling into oblivion.
Recent research into early modern social groups in which women gained access to literary language has focused on the coteries in which they learned to perform alongside men, improvising poems later printed in books.(1) The typical coterie in Italy, through which women such as Veronica Franco made their way into print, was the humanist academy centered around a court or a group of urban noblemen, such as the Venier academy in Venice.
For Gaisser, this social world is essentially literary, the world of academic coteries, publishers of belles-lettres, and practicing poets.
FRANK O'HARA: THE POETICS OF COTERIE BY LYTLE SHAW.