ballerina

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  • noun

Synonyms for ballerina

a female ballet dancer

References in periodicals archive ?
The position of coryphee is a common distinction in Europe.
Through dancers of varied experience--including teenage students, debutants, coryphees, premiere danseuses and a former star attempting a comeback--Normand captures the ongoing metamorphosis of the ballerina from first flowering to maturity to fulfillment, to paraphrase the somewhat grandiloquent narration (greatly helped in the English version by Diane Baker's dry tones).
She earned a coryphee spot (the second rank of five), and the following fall, Millepied replaced Brigitte Lefevre as director.
That approach has taken her from coryphee to corps member to her current level since joining MCB in 1999.
The coryphee (front corps dancer) determines the direction of the lines.
One of the most dazzling photos is of coryphee Alexandra Cardinale, costumed for Serenade in the spectacular Foyer de la Danse, her head resting on her leg propped up on the barre.
"In putting together the program," says Seay, "we kept an open door." This let company members--from coryphee Patricia Delgado fluffing out her "Black Swan" to principal Luis Serrano shedding feathers in his hilarious Dying Swan--regale partygoers with dancing straight from their hearts.
She joined the Maryinsky as a coryphee in 1899, one rank above corps de ballet.
I remember him well at precisely that time, coming on the Royal Opera House stage at Covent Garden, one of the two coryphee boys with the visiting NYCB in Balanchine's Bourree Fantasque.
Deane took Picone into ENB as a coryphee, then promoted him to soloist in 1994.
That interest remained throughout the years, as he rose to the rank of coryphee at the Paris Opera, and continued until Nureyev died.
No matter Yuri Grigorovich's tacky, oddly patched-together Swan Lake; everyone, down to the merest coryphee, had an ingrained sense of style.