conjure

(redirected from conjured)
Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.
Related to conjured: Abominations
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • phrase

Synonyms for conjure

produce

conjure something up

Synonyms

Synonyms for conjure

to make an earnest or urgent request

Synonyms for conjure

ask for or request earnestly

engage in plotting or enter into a conspiracy, swear together

References in periodicals archive ?
And just as chilling, if not terrifying, is the series of cases conjured up and filed against persons daring to speak out against, or even just constructively criticize or remind, the Duterte administration about excesses particularly in the human rights department.
Forster and I conjured bravely...a hot plum pudding was produced from an empty saucepan, held over a blazing fire, kindled in Stanfield's hat, without damage to the lining...a box of bran was changed into a live Guinea Pig, which ran between my God child's feet...three half crowns being taken from Major Burns and put into a tumbler-glass before his eyes did then and there give jingling answers unto questions asked of them by me.
A quirky fantasy, by turns sweet and dark, Conjured provides a rewarding experience that fades a bit with post-reading consideration.
The charm is placed under the door-sill, or buried under the hearth, or hidden in the mattress of the person to be conjured. (p.
Huddersfield Circle of Magicians has conjured up plenty of talent in its day but now wants to pull a few new members out of the hat.
Summary: Pixie Lott conjured up an amazing and original Halloween treat for her fans.
These are not figures conjured up, they are real flesh and blood nurses, wearing real uniforms, caring for real sick patients.
If the paintings that spawned Sallemania two decades ago conjured up cinematic montage and theatrical staging, the "Vortex" series conjures up ...
While it offers some spectacular vistas conjured up by veteran cinematographer Louis de Ernsted, it rarely has the grandeur, or the poetic intensity, of an epic.