conjuration

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Synonyms for conjuration

the use of skillful tricks and deceptions to produce entertainingly baffling effects

the use of supernatural powers to influence or predict events

Synonyms for conjuration

a ritual recitation of words or sounds believed to have a magical effect

calling up a spirit or devil

References in periodicals archive ?
Avoiding conjuration, Blau recognizes how ghosting became their process, and he maintains its autonomous character.
Part 1 lays the contextual scaffolding for the project, situating the conjuration in the contemporary lexicological, philosophical, and literary landscapes.
(28) Anon., An Act against Conjuration, Witchcraft and dealing with evil and wicked Spirits 1604 1 Jas.
Sacrapant complies with an act of conjuration in which he makes appear on his table (altar) "Meat, drinke and bred" (368).
In these diabolical conjurations, prayers intermingled with superstitious formulae until the average listener could not tell the difference.
While echoes of Yaacov Agam, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Bridget Riley, and Victor Vasarely linger (as do hints of latterday retro-psychedelia), Blinderman's premise that the visual conjurations of current artists don't just sit on the surface of the painting, they transgress the frame and move right into the viewer's space - a realm profoundly complicated in recent years by spectacular advances in computer graphics and digital special effects, by IMAX virtuality and Magic Eye conundrums - is pretty convincing.
For when they write magic chants intending to address them to those powers, not only to the soul but to those above it as well, what are they doing except making the powers obey the word and follow the lead of people who say spells and charms and conjurations, any one of us who is well skilled in the art of saying precisely the right things in the right way, songs and cries and aspirated and hissing sounds and everything else which their writings say has magic power in the higher world?
The adept of mayombe or palo makes use of earth, wood from the forest, stories, animals and all types of plants or objects that aid in the accomplishment of the conjurations undertaken for the client's sake.
These highly subjective conjurations had to be challenged by the reader, who needed to decide whether he or she agreed with them or not.
Sullivan, whose hyperbolical rhapsodies and conjurations on Beethoven, Newton, and Einstein' had so endeared him to the book's twin protagonist, Henry Airbubble.
Some statements may function as conjurations (Alvesson and Koping 1993: Chap.
This dramatic and visionary aspect of Vizenor's fiction connects him with a group of contemporary American novelists who might be called "magic revolutionaries." Writers like Ishmael Reed, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, and Leslie Silko have adopted many of the characteristics of magic ralism, in the tradition of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but have gone one step farther by believing that their visions will become actual political reality, just as the successful conjurations of a shaman come alive.
Henning's Ein Bet- und Beichtbuch); 13) diverse liturgical compositions (including, e.g., a scribe's introduction to a manuscript hymnal, fragments of confessional recitations to be intoned by the electi), etc.; 14) various miscellaneous prayers, invocations, and conjurations. The second section featuring the Turkish (i.e., Uighur) material contains three separate subdivisions: 1) hymns to Mani; 2) general hymns and prayers; 3) confessional formulas, among which is included a lengthy extract from the Xuastvanift.
Charles Johnson's first collection of short stories, The Sorcerer's Apprentice (1986), contains eight "tales and conjurations." The stories had been published in several venues over the course of seven years (1977-1984) and differed significantly in their subject matter.
To move from author to editor, the latter should have caught the innumerable awkward phrases like "saintly conjurations," "saintly supplications," "saintly devotions," "mortal simulation," "sorcerous miracles," or "crucifixional victory." Maybe these are small matters, hardly worthy of inclusion in a brief review.