confidence


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Related to confidence: confidence interval
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Synonyms for confidence

secret

Synonyms

in confidence

Synonyms

Synonyms for confidence

absolute certainty in the trustworthiness of another

a firm belief in one's own powers

the fact or condition of being without doubt

Synonyms for confidence

a feeling of trust (in someone or something)

a state of confident hopefulness that events will be favorable

Related Words

a trustful relationship

a secret that is confided or entrusted to another

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Waiting,' returns the Analytical in responsive confidence.
I wish it, that I may the better deserve your confidence, and have no secret from you.
Very good, my dear,' replied Mrs Nickleby, with great confidence.
If it be otherwise, I have that confidence in Kate that I know she will feel as I do--and in you, dear mother, to be assured that after a little consideration you will do the same.
But between Evelina and other girls there was this difference, that where another would have poured out her feelings quite naturally, Evelina regarded these innocent confidences as a concession made to the stormy emotions which had invaded the quiet sanctuary of her girlish soul.
To stroll through the fields, to be alone together at times if we wished it, to look over an old water-mill, to sit beneath a tree in some lovely glen among the hills, the lovers' talks, the sweet confidences drawn forth by which each made some progress day by day in the other's heart.
Since confidence is based on uniqueness, a good place to start growing in confidence is to explore your uniqueness.
Gallup has typically seen a slight uptick in economic confidence on Thanksgiving as a result.
The poll of 1,020 adults found confidence in the judiciary rose to 61 percent from 53 percent while confidence in the executive branch rose 8 points to 51 percent and confidence in Congress improved 7 points to 35 percent.
Using her personal journey from a teenager who lacked confidence to a confident speaker and author, McLean provides practical strategies and tools for confidence-building in a self-guided, loose-leaf workbook.
The 2014 General Social Survey finds only 23 percent of Americans have a great deal of confidence in the Supreme Court, 11 percent in the executive branch and 5 percent in Congress.
So far, all of the aforementioned models for confidence including self-efficacy theory, perceived competence, and sport confidence provide useful insights into understanding the importance of self-confidence as a key mediator of behaviour and motivation.
The growth in confidence builds on the positive trend going back to the third quarter of 2013.